diamondback rattlesnake


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Related to diamondback rattlesnake: timber rattlesnake, Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

diamondback rattlesnake

n.
Either of two large venomous rattlesnakes (Crotalus adamanteus or C. atrox) found in the southern and western United States and in Mexico and having diamond-shaped markings on the back.

diamondback rattlesnake

Any of three species of rattlesnake: the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (C. adamanteus), found in the southeast U.S.; the red diamond rattlesnake (C.ruber), found in southwest California and in Baja California, Mexico; and the western diamondback rattlesnake (C. atrox), found in the U.S. and Mexico.
See also: rattlesnake
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References in periodicals archive ?
Eight long-term captive western diamondback rattlesnakes, Crotalus atrox, were observed in this study.
2 -- color) A muzzled diamondback rattlesnake coils up at the Canyon Country clinic Saturday.
You're far safer dealing with crocodiles and western diamondback rattlesnakes than the executives and the producers and all those sharks in the big MGM building.
Diamondback rattlesnakes are indigenous to our part of southern Idaho.
The four poisonous snakes found throughout most of the peninsula are diamondback rattlesnakes, pigmy rattlesnakes, water moccasins and coral snakes.
It is unforgiving territory, and home to wild horses, boar, scorpions and diamondback rattlesnakes.
The group's campaign to outlaw "rattlesnake round-ups"-contests whereby hunters collect and kill as many snakes as they can in a year--has helped stem population declines of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes.
Discrimination between envenomated and nonenvenomated prey by western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox): Chemosensory consequences of venom.
They sat in two separate tubs, each with 75 Western Diamondback rattlesnakes, on the set of Guinness World Records: Primetime.
Along the Arizona Trail, exhibits provide up-close looks at diamondback rattlesnakes, hairy scorpions, pink-and-black gila monsters, tarantulas, turkey vultures and mountain lions.
Now, Krochmal and George Bakken, also of Indiana State, report on the first tests of whether the facial pits also help western diamondback rattlesnakes protect themselves from overheating.
Lennie Jones, a special agent with USFWS, said recently that rattlesnake roundups in the Southeastern United States could "spell doom" for eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, whose populations have declined over much of their biological range.