dialysis

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Related to dialyses: hemodialysis, kidney failure, peritoneal dialysis, Kidney Dialysis

dialysis

 [di-al´ĭ-sis] (Gr.)
1. the diffusion of solute molecules through a semipermeable membrane, normally passing from the side of higher concentration to that of lower. A semipermeable membrane is one that allows the passage of certain smaller molecules of such crystalloids as glucose and urea, but prevents passage of larger molecules such as the colloidal plasma proteins and protoplasm. adj., adj dialyt´ic.
continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritoneal dialysis involving the continuous presence of dialysis solution in the peritoneal cavity; see discussion at peritoneal dialysis.
continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) a procedure similar to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis but taking place at night, using a machine to make several fluid exchanges automatically. See discussion at peritoneal dialysis.
dialysis dysequilibrium syndrome a condition occasionally seen following overly rapid hemodialysis, characterized by increased intracranial pressure that causes nausea, headache, vomiting, restlessness, and a decreased level of consciousness. The neurological complications may lead to coma and death if not treated. The cause of this syndrome is thought to be the rapid decrease in the blood urea nitrogen that accompanies dialysis. Called also dialysis dysequilibrium.
extracorporeal dialysis dialysis by a hemodialyzer; see also hemodialysis.
intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD) an older form of peritoneal dialysis in which dialysis solution is infused into the peritoneal cavity, allowed to equilibrate for 10 to 20 minutes, and then drained out. See discussion at peritoneal dialysis.
kidney dialysis hemodialysis.
peritoneal dialysis see peritoneal dialysis.
renal dialysis hemodialysis.

di·al·y·sis

(dī-al'i-sis),
1. A form of filtration to separate crystalloid from colloid substances (or smaller molecules from larger ones) in a solution by interposing a semipermeable membrane between the solution and dialyzing fluid; the crystalloid (smaller) substances pass through the membrane into the dialyzing fluid on the other side, the colloids do not.
2. The separation of substances across a semipermeable membrane on the basis of particle size or concentration gradients.
3. A method of artificial kidney function.
[G. a separation, fr. dialyo, to separate]

dialysis

/di·al·y·sis/ (di-al´ĭ-sis) [Gr.]
1. the process of separating macromolecules from ions and low molecular weight compounds in solution by the difference in their rates of diffusion through a semipermeable membrane, through which crystalloids pass readily but colloids pass slowly or not at all.
2. hemodialysis.dialyt´ic

equilibrium dialysis  a technique of determination of the association constant of hapten-antibody reactions.
lymph dialysis  removal of urea and other elements from lymph collected from the thoracic duct, treated outside the body, and later reinfused.
peritoneal dialysis  dialysis through the peritoneum, the dialyzing solution being introduced into and removed from the peritoneal cavity, as either a continuous or an intermittent procedure.

dialysis

(dī-ăl′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. dialy·ses (-sēz′)
1. The separation of smaller molecules from larger molecules or of dissolved substances from colloidal particles in a solution by selective diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.
2. Medicine Any of several techniques, especially hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, in which filtration through a semipermeable membrane is used to remove metabolic wastes and excess fluid from the blood of people with kidney failure.

di′a·lyt′ic (-ə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.
di′a·lyt′i·cal·ly adv.

dialysis

[dī·al′isis]
Etymology: Gk dia + lysis a loosening
1 the process of separating colloids and crystalline substances in solution by the difference in their rate of diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.
2 a medical procedure for the removal of certain elements from the blood or lymph by virtue of the difference in their rates of diffusion through an external semipermeable membrane or, in the case of peritoneal dialysis, through the peritoneum. Dialysis may be used to remove poisons and excessive amounts of drugs, to correct serious electrolyte and acid-base imbalances, and to remove urea, uric acid, and creatinine in cases of chronic end-stage renal disease. Dialysis involves diffusion of particles from an area of high to lower concentration, osmosis of fluid across the membrane from an area of lesser to one of greater concentration of particles, and ultrafiltration or movement of fluid across the membrane as a result of an artificially created pressure differential. See also hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis.
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Dialysis

dialysis

Nephrology The separation of molecules in solution based on differences in size; in renal failure, dialysis is used to separate macromolecules from low-molecular-weight molecules, using a semipermeable membrane Therapeutics The clearance of a drug by a hemodialysis unit. See Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis.

di·al·y·sis

(dī-al'i-sis)
1. A form of filtration to separate crystalloid from colloid substances (or smaller molecules from larger ones) in a solution by interposing a semipermeable membrane between the solution and water; the crystalloid (smaller) substances pass through the membrane into the water on the other side, the colloids do not.
Synonym(s): diffusion (2) .
2. The separation of substances across a semipermeable membrane on the basis of particle size and/or concentration gradients.
3. A method of artificial kidney function.
[G. a separation, fr. dialyo, to separate]

dialysis

Separation of substances in solution by using membranes through which only molecules below a particular size can pass. Dialysis is the basis of artificial kidney machines.

dialysis

a process by which small molecules can be separated from larger ones using a fine semipermeable membrane, e.g. cellophane or visking tubing, to contain the larger molecules, but which allows the smaller molecules to pass through into the water on the other side. The kidney machine, used in cases of kidney disease or failure, works on the dialysis principle, with arterial blood from the patient's arm being pumped through the dialysis tube then back into a vein. Holes in the tubing allow small molecules such as glucose, salt and urea to diffuse out into a bath of water, salts and glucose, while leaving behind the proteins such as albumin in the blood.

Dialysis

A process of filtering and removing waste products from the bloodstream. Two main types are hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. In hemodialysis, the blood flows out of the body into a machine that filters out the waste products and routes the cleansed blood back into the body. In peritoneal dialysis, the cleansing occurs inside the body. Dialysis fluid is injected into the peritoneal cavity and wastes are filtered through the peritoneum, the thin membrane that surrounds the abdominal organs.

di·al·y·sis

(dī-al'i-sis)
1. Filtration to separate crystalloid from colloid substances (or smaller molecules from larger ones) in a solution by interposing a semipermeable membrane between solution and dialyzing fluid; crystalloid (smaller) substances pass through membrane into dialyzing fluid on other side, colloids do not.
2. Separation of substances across a semipermeable membrane on basis of particle size or concentration gradients.
3. Method of artificial kidney function.
[G. a separation, fr. dialyo, to separate]

dialysis (dīal´isis),

n a type of filtration used to separate smaller molecules from larger ones contained in a solution. The molecular solution is placed on one side of a semipermeable membrane and water on the other side. The smaller molecules pass through the membrane into the water; the larger molecules are retained in the solution.
dialysis, kidney, artificial,

dialysis

the diffusion of solute molecules through a semipermeable membrane, passing from the side of higher concentration to that of the lower; a method sometimes used in cases of defective renal function to remove from the blood elements that are normally excreted in the urine (hemodialysis). The principles of dialysis are utilized in renal dialysis with a hemodialyzer (hemodialysis) and in peritoneal dialysis.

extracorporeal dialysis
dialysis by a hemodialyzer. See hemodialysis.
peritoneal dialysis
dialysis through the peritoneum, the dialyzing solution being introduced into and removed from the peritoneal cavity, as either a continuous or an intermittent procedure. See also peritoneal dialysis.

Patient discussion about dialysis

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

Q. why the renal doctor told my husband that he needs to eat a dozen of egg a week for protein,how it will help? it won`t afect his cholesterol,also i would like to know what role the protein plays on his treatment and what other foot its rich in protein that he can can take,without causing problems to his health.

A. if i understand correctly, your husband is diabetic. like my grandfather he probably developed a "Diabetic nephropathy" which is a long name to: kidney being destroyed because of blood vessels clotted by diabetes. because of that destruction the kidneys allow protein to go out in the urine. this is a dangerous situation,a protein in the name of "albomin" helps our blood to hold fluids in blood vessels. without it fluid will leave the blood and go to our organs. not a good situation. so he needs a lot of proteins.
here is a list of a 100 protein rich foods:
http://smarterfitter.com/blog/2007/10/28/100-most-protein-rich-vegetarian-foods/

More discussions about dialysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Comme les donnees canadiennes anterieures relatives au controle du calcium, du phosphate et de l'albumine n'etaient pas disponibles, nous n'avons examine que les variations des resultats en relation avec la dose de dialyse, l'hemoglobine et le type d'abord vasculaire qui sont incluses dans les donnees de l'etude CNPPS.
Le tableau 2 montre le nombre prevu de patients et d'annees-patients en dialyse sur une periode de cinq ans, soit de 2006 a 2010.
C'est principalement pour ces raisons que les specialistes encouragent la greffe renale qui permet une economie d'argent et offre une meilleure qualite de vie que la dialyse.
Le ministere de la sante, en tant que garant de la sante de toute la population, independamment des moyens des uns et des autres, a consenti de grands efforts en ce qui concerne la dialyse.
Parmi les 3000 voire 4000 nouveaux qui atteignent chaque annee le stade terminal de l'insuffisance renale chronique, seule une partie arrive a etre prise en charge en dialyse.
En outre, la dialyse engendre des couts enormes, les seances coutent pres de 10.
Le risque d'evolution vers le stade terminal necessitant la dialyse ou une greffe renale nombre augmente de 4 % par an.
Malheureusement, l'insuffisance renale evolue de facon insidieuse et sournoise, de sorte que, quand le malade commence a se plaindre de fatigue ou de manque d'appetit, il est souvent trop tard, et on ne peut que lui proposer la dialyse.
Accordingly, when both kidneys of each donor were transplanted, pretreatment of 10 donors prevented the need for multiple dialyses in 2 renal transplant recipients," the authors wrote.
Le deuxieme article s'intitule * Understanding the lived experience of loss and grieving in persons with end-stage renal disease: A humanbecoming approach *Comprendre l'experience de perte et de deuil vecue par les personnes atteintes d'insuffisance renale terminale: Une approche de la theorie de l'humain en devenir], par Jennifer Duteau, chef de pratique clinique, Nephrologie et dialyse, au Humber River Regional Hospital, a Weston, en Ontario.
Notre clinique de pre dialyse est maintenant en operation.
On evalue qu'au moment d'entreprendre la dialyse, les trois quarts des patients presentent deja une hypertrophie ventriculaire gauche et ceci en soi est un puissant indicateur de mortalite (Ayus et al.