dialect

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Related to dialectally: Dialectical reasoning

dialect

[dī′əlekt]
a variation of spoken language different from other forms of the same language in pronunciation, syntax, and word meanings. A particular dialect is usually shared by members of an ethnic group, socioeconomic group, or people living together in a geographic area.

dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
References in periodicals archive ?
While sporadic replacement of dialectally alien words is frequent in Middle English texts, including the manuscripts of Piers Plowman, large-scale lexical translation is much less common.
Secondly, this approach conceals a problem commented upon by a number of Arabicists, namely that (3) does not correlate well with anything else dialectally.
It is worth turning now to other aspects of our study because although texts have been written in particular dialectal areas they may or may not contain dialectally marked forms.
16); and that its dialectally mixed character is not unusual among Indian literary languages, but rather is typical of them (p.
The basic assumption of this paper is that the prototypes of the ME -LICH(E)/-LY suffixes will exhibit a variety of token forms which will be dialectally conditioned.
It is our intention to analyse the development of this dialectally relevant Middle Kentish diphthong (in either the first (unique) or second constituent of a compound noun), by checking our early Middle English material (i.
4) On this basis, it was possible to build up a typological framework that allowed the localisation of more than a thousand Late Middle English texts, (5) each shown to be dialectally consistent.
The individual author from whom most -u- forms are cited is AElfric, whom there is reason to place dialectally in the bight of the Bristol Avon in north-west Wiltshire not far from S1577(i).
Wakelin notes that "these -n forms are on the whole widespread dialectally except in the north" (1977: 116).