dialect

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dialect

[dī′əlekt]
a variation of spoken language different from other forms of the same language in pronunciation, syntax, and word meanings. A particular dialect is usually shared by members of an ethnic group, socioeconomic group, or people living together in a geographic area.

dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bettoni concludes that Italian-dialect bilingualism was much more widespread among overseas migrants than the overall figures of dialectal monolingualism of the 1950s and 1960s would suggest.
There is a clear correlation between the dialectal origin of a village, and the name of its gong ensemble, the number of gongs in the ensemble, the musical nomenclature of gongs, the presence or absence of a drum that plays with the gongs in the ensemble, and subtle variations in gong music styles.
35) serve to illustrate the existence of dialectal features in the narrative voice in MacGill's novel.
Kallas supports, with good reason, Jerome Lentin's claim of the existence of a dialectal Levantine koine in the Ottoman period.
Dunbar was well aware that the written dialectal conventions that he inherited arrived politically compromised and ideologically overdetermined by their centuries' old use (at least since Chaucer's time) as a denigrating marker that simultaneously naturalized the speech of one group as a standard, against which dialectal variation was stigmatized.
Chapter Eight, "Language and Dialectal Variations," presents critical information about serving a multicultural society and focuses on the influence of other languages and dialects on phonological disorders.
Otherwise, for example, the Qur'an would not originally have been revealed in Arabic with dialectal and foreign lexicographical influence.
62); the unreliability of dialectal forms as evidence for manuscript localization (pp.
No more schools or barracks as tools of formation or taming (if we follow Michel Foucault), or as channels of a "civilizing process" (if we follow Norbert Elias), but as bargaining places, as translation processes (in a figurative or proper meaning), as places of transfers and contacts, positive or negative, between rural, dialectal, popular, regional habitus, (if we follow yet Pierre Bourdieu) and what I propose to call "national habitus" (30) progressively defined by leading elements of elites and middle classes occupying for a while an hegemonic cultural position.
The text comes full circle in the last chapter by returning to the topic of dialectal variation that is introduced in the first chapter, but expands it to include varieties of Italian outside Italy like the Italian of North American immigrant communities, and social varieties (for example, adolescent language).
In other words, by directly comparing Cairene women's use of non-classical standard variants with women's use of standard variants in non-diglossic communities she showed that Cairene women can be interpreted as using standard urban dialectal forms.