diagnostic specificity


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Related to diagnostic specificity: diagnostic sensitivity

di·ag·nos·tic spec·i·fic·i·ty

the probability (P) that, given the absence of disease (D), a normal test result (T) excludes disease; that is, P(T/D).

diagnostic specificity

the conditional probability that a person not having a disease will be correctly identified by a clinical test, i.e., the number of true negative results divided by the total number of those without the disease (which is the sum of the numbers of true negative plus false positive results).

di·ag·nos·tic spe·ci·fi·ci·ty

(dī-ăg-nos'tik spes'i-fis'i-tē)
1. The probability (P) that, given the absence of disease (D), a normal test result (T) excludes disease; i.e., P(T/D).
2. Specificity (%) = number of patients without the disease who test negative × 100 ÷ total number tested without the disease.

diagnostic specificity

For a diagnostic or screening test, the proportion of people who are truly free of a specific disease and are so identified by the test.
See: sensitivity
See also: specificity
References in periodicals archive ?
When the control sera from the same sample set of donors were used, the numbers of true negatives and false positives were 15 and 4, respectively, suggesting a diagnostic specificity of 78.
The diagnostic sensitivity of this test is about 97%, with 100% diagnostic specificity.
A limitation of this study was the inclusion of a small number of TN samples, only 6 -12 with the 5-[micro]g/L DrugTest 5000 and 1- and 2-[micro]g/L confirmation cutoffs, to adequately evaluate diagnostic specificity.
In the present study, methylated markers BMP3, NDRG4, VIM, TFPI2, and their combination detected most colorectal cancers and adenomas > 1 cm at high diagnostic specificity when assayed with QuARTS, which is consistent with previous reports by us and others (6, 7, 13-15).
The diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for predicting a serious outcome with the 99th percentiles were: 60.
As a result of improved analytical sensitivity, the clinical diagnostic specificity of all high-sensitivity troponin assays is decreased.
A very promising feature of this work is the potential for the APNS biomarker to add to the diagnostic specificity of the early diagnosis.
This evolution has led to a decrease in diagnostic specificity for the diagnosis of AMI, a concern to many clinicians who may incorrectly equate any increased cardiac troponin value to an AMI (7, 8).
The preliminary results, thus far, suggest a significant improvement in normalcy rate, or diagnostic specificity, using VANTAGE.
Positive predictive values (PPVs), NPVs, diagnostic sensitivity, and diagnostic specificity, as well as the odds ratio for the target marker combination, were assessed by first applying a marker-specific cutoff value, both for AMI and for non-STEMI after the exclusion of STEMI patients.
Increasing the diagnostic sensitivity for myocardial injury may be accompanied by loss of diagnostic specificity for the diagnosis of AMI, given that many other insults, both acute and chronic, can result in increased cardiac troponin concentrations (4).

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