diachronic

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Related to diachrony: synchrony and diachrony

di·a·chron·ic

(dī'ă-kron'ik),
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional; the inferences are equivalent only where there is strict stability of all elements.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]

di·a·chron·ic

(dī-ă-kron'ik)
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]
References in periodicals archive ?
16] The linguistic diachrony implicit in such reformed claims does not always or necessarily result in the right reading of a Patristic text, but it finds sustenance in texts that often exhibit a different use and signal a divergent understanding of the verb to be from that of the Scholastics.
The third, evolutionary component is connected with the so-called minor diachrony, the analysis of the technical and psychological features of the translation process.
This latitude/longitude paradigm is of course classically structuralist, plotted along the same x-y graph and organized by the same relational tensions as the models of synchrony and diachrony, or of metaphor and metonymy, and it deconstructs itself in much the same manner: Cowley's latitudinal approach founders on Faulkner's imperfect, centrifugal repetitions; Urgo's longitudinal reading recuperates the holistic latitudinal impulse.
Moglichkeiten der Darstellung der Diachronie in narrativen Texten" [Representing Diachrony in Narrative Texts].
Which is to say that synchrony (the language of the Mishnah) yields to diachrony, as the later generations of amoraim attribute vastly different meanings to individual tannaitic sources, and inevitably the Mishnah as a whole.
one answer would no doubt be: Saussure's influential distinction in the Course in General Linguistics between diachrony and synchrony, between language as an entity constantly changing through time, and language as a system existing at a given moment, and, more particularly, his privileging of the latter over the former.
Time is characterized as a disquietude of the Same by the Other, an interruption that is diachrony itself.
I also think that the sociality where responsibility is made concrete injustice calls for and founds the objectivity of theoretical language, which "gathers" the diachrony of time into presence and representation through accounts and histories, and-up to a certain point-understands reason-in view of justice itself- by comparing "incomparable and unique" persons in a knowing thought, comparing them as beings - that is , as individuals of a genus.
It takes on its value from that very diachrony in which the only constant factor is the subjectivity of the writer himself.
Thus, certain representations are more successful or 'contagious' in some societies than in others, and an essential diachrony is entailed in the transformation of knowledge or material culture from the status of innovation to that of 'tradition'.
Commenting on Santaraksita's half-verse (TS 349ab), Kamalagila explains that the Buddha's mention of the person in the Bharasatra referred to nothing but the five constituents considered either as a collection (samudilya; in the synchrony of a totality) or as a stream (santana: in the diachrony of causality)--such is, besides, the ordinary world's understanding of "person.
Thus, diachrony is an indispensible tool for discussing language history and development (Hansen 2001: 13).