diachronic


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Related to diachronic: Diachronic linguistics, diachronic study

di·a·chron·ic

(dī'ă-kron'ik),
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional; the inferences are equivalent only where there is strict stability of all elements.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]

di·a·chron·ic

(dī-ă-kron'ik)
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]
References in periodicals archive ?
To conclude, the book provides a comparative view of three Neo-Semitic languages focusing on the issue of topicalization--its language-specific oppositions, its diachronic sources and trajectories, and its different functional values.
The synchronic money pump strips away the dramatic device of exploitation to reveal the core defect allegedly demonstrated by the original diachronic version; but the standard objections to the latter can likewise be stripped of the drama to target that core directly.
b) can have diachronic changes in probabilities even if the certainty set does not change
We cannot find any clear proof in Vanmontfort's (2008) paper that an analytic method based on the regional frequencies of microliths yields any reliable diachronic occupation patterns that correspond with traditional site-based approaches to land use.
According to Levenson, the modern preoccupation with history has imposed a diachronic lens upon a corpus whose own internal workings suggest a synchronic approach.
One response might be that, in spite of the foregoing, Aristotle just means for these expressions to be co-referential, in the light of the preponderance of synchronic occurrences over diachronic occurrences of the expression 'same in [phi], different in [psi]', (32) and the fact that in his longest digression on the expression itself in Physics Book III 3, Aristotle chooses a synchronic example (the road between Athens and Thebes that can be described as either uphill or downhill).
There is a further and more significant problem with this example of a diachronic approach.
Several contributors note the translators' and travel writers' problematic relationship with the truth; here too the analysis throws up significant diachronic issues.
Boykan proposes a diachronic mode of musical analysis that considers not only the function of musical details but also the temporal location of such details.
There is no narration, though the work is regarded as a novel, and even when the writer occasionally chooses a single character to concentrate on for substantial treatment in a segment, as with Saira in "Exclusivity" and Tara in "Trees Made of Light," his attention is on the synchronic and never on the diachronic, and narration never becomes a narrative.
Such an infallible teaching is thus objectively set forth by the whole episcopal body, understood in a diachronic and not necessarily merely synchronic sense.
More interested in highlighting the relative strengths and weaknesses of various "perspectives" than in writing a purely diachronic history of theories, Bell traces the genealogy of three broad methodological approaches: (1) those seeking the origins and/or essence of ritual; (2) functionalists and structuralists; and (3) culturalists, including symbolists, linguists, "performance" theorists, and most recently, the "practice" theorists who have most deeply influenced Bell's own approach.