glomerulopathy

(redirected from diabetic glomerulopathy)

glomerulopathy

 [glo-mer″u-lop´ah-the]
any disease, especially any noninflammatory disease, of the renal glomeruli.
diabetic glomerulopathy intercapillary glomerulosclerosis.

glo·mer·u·lop·a·thy

(glō-mer'yū-lop'ă-thē),
Glomerular disease of any type.
[glomerulus + G. pathos, suffering]

glomerulopathy

/glo·mer·u·lop·a·thy/ (glo-mer″u-lop´ah-the) any disease of the renal glomeruli.
diabetic glomerulopathy  intercapillary glomerulosclerosis.

glo·mer·u·lop·a·thy

(glō-mer'yū-lop'ă-thē)
Glomerular disease of any type.
[glomerulus + G. pathos, suffering]

glomerulopathy

any disease, especially any noninflammatory disease, of the renal glomeruli.

Finnish-Landrace glomerulopathy
see membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.
Samoyed hereditary glomerulopathy
inherited as an X-linked dominant trait it affects males more severely and earlier than females; wasting and proteinuria are characteristic; males are dead by 15 months of age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Capillaries are variably thickened as compared with the uniform thickening seen in diabetic glomerulopathy.
The diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) can usually be made with careful clinical and laboratory assessment, but kidney biopsy might be required to prove the presence of diabetic glomerulopathy.
Structural and functional changes in diabetic glomerulopathy.
Microalbuminuria in the type 2 patient may be caused by the endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance rather than diabetic glomerulopathy, which would explain the lower rate of progression to diabetic nephropathy in the type 2 patient.
Taken together, these results indicate that Cnidii rhizoma and Tabanus inhibit the high glucose-induced GMC proliferation partially through suppressing the ECM accumulation and TGF-[beta]1 production, suggesting that these medicines may be a promising agent for treating the development and progression of diabetic glomerulopathy.
Diabetic glomerulopathy is characterized by an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) (Steffes et al.
It has been known that TGF-[beta]1 plays a central role in accumulation of ECM proteins in diabetic glomerulopathy (Sharma and Ziyadeh, 1995).
Elevated glucose concentration causes an excessive deposition of glomerular ECM component and subsequent mesangial expansion, which are the principal structural lesion in diabetic glomerulopathy (Ayo et al.
Pathophysiologically, GMCs cultured in high glucose-contained medium exhibit the typical features of cell proliferation and excessive accumulation of mesangial ECM components that are characteristics of diabetic glomerulopathy in vivo (Isono et al.
For example, question 2*4 assumed a basic knowledge of histologic and ultrastructural characteristics of diabetic glomerulopathy (diabetic patient with a transplanted kidney).
Taken together, these results indicate that Phytolaccaceae inhibits the high glucose-induced GMCs proliferation partially through suppressing accumulation of ECM components and TGF-[beta] production, suggesting that Phytolaccaceae may be a promising agent for treating the development and progression of diabetic glomerulopathy.
This cytokine also plays a central role in the development of glomerular hypertrophy and accumulation of ECM components in diabetic glomerulopathy (Ignotz et al.