diabetic eye disease


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Related to diabetic eye disease: diabetic retinopathy

diabetic eye disease

cataract (due to osmotic damage to lens), blurring of vision (associated with 'see-sawing' blood glucose levels) and retinopathy (microvascular damage, presenting as background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy) in patients with diabetes; see retinopathy
References in periodicals archive ?
works closely with individuals living with diabetes to identify and treat diabetic eye disease early in order to prevent future complications.
You can help yourself to reduce the risk of diabetic eye disease by: always attending your appointments, controlling your blood sugar levels, eating healthily, stop smoking, monitoring your blood pressure and taking your medication as prescribed.
The diabetic eye disease (resources) are popular because there are so many diabetes management programs across the country," Ammary-Risch told The Nation's Health.
com, that offers information about diabetic eye diseases including facts and symptoms, as well as details around comprehensive dilated eye exams.
Managing diabetic eye disease is critical to reducing severe vision impairment.
is sharing information about diabetic eye disease and dilated eye exams to encourage those with diabetes to take proactive steps to protect their vision.
He also developed the system now used throughout the UK for screening for diabetic eye disease, and has demonstrated reduction in blindness rates in Newcastle.
Ruben Lim Bon Siong said, is a tool to diagnose and monitor the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic eye disease.
Once diabetes develops, there is a risk that diabetic eye disease may cause serious loss of vision.
In the United States, diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age adults.
Participants who lost excess pounds experienced a 31 percent reduction in their risk of advanced kidney disease and a 14 percent reduction in their risk of diabetic eye disease.
The vehicle, which is touring the country as part of the RNIB's Save a Our Sight campaign, has cameras on its roof which are connected to screens that allow visitors to see through the eyes of people y who have a conditions such as glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic eye disease and age related macular degeneration.