dextranase


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dex·tran·ase

(deks'tran-ās),
An enzyme hydrolyzing α-1,6-d-glucosidic linkages in dextran; used in the prevention of caries.

dex·tran·ase

(deks'tră-nās)
An enzyme hydrolyzing 1,6-α-d-glucosidic linkages in dextran; used in the prevention of caries.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These results indicate that the dextran chain in these Dex-GMA hydrogel can be accessible to dextranase diffused into the hydrogel.
But determining which type of dextranase enzyme to use can be a challenge.
Allele-specific PCR primers were designed based on the dextranase gene to identify Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sorbrinus in dental plaque.
It contains the enzyme dextranase and a scrubbing agent to remove difficult-to-dislodge plaque and fluorine to promote the re-mineralization of teeth.
For years, factories have been operating on faith," says Eggleston, "assuming that the dextranase they're using will do the job.
Enzymes (amylase, carbohydrase, cellulase, protease, dextranase, mannase, pectic enzyme, phytase, xylanase,
The following products are addressed in this report: - Organic acids (citric acid, itaconic acid, lactic acid) - Amino acids (lysine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, phenylalanine, others) - Enzymes (amylase, carbohydrase, cellulase, protease, dextranase, mannase, pectic enzyme, phytase, xylanase, others) - Bio-ethanol - Vitamins (C, B2) Information provided in this report includes: - Industry Overview - Important factors influencing the industry - Overcapacity - Technology - Pollution - State Owned Enterprises - Multinationals - Products - Organic acids - Amino acids - Enzymes - Bio-ethanol - Vitamins - Directory - Index of Manufacturers
The invention describes a bispecific, or two-armed antibody, in which one part attaches to a substance associated with the disease (such as a cancer or microbial antigen), and the second part directed against an enzyme that is not natural to humans, such as a cellulase or dextranase.
6 million a year; dextranase and amylase applications; and introducing a new method to measure sugarcane deterioration.
For example, Bacillus can produce some useful enzymes ([alpha]-amylase, arabinase, cellulase, dextranase, levansucrase, maltase, alkaline protease, neutral protease and [beta]-glucanase) (Priest, 1977; Hentges, 1992) that were found to improve feed efficiency and weight gain of weaned piglets (Zani et al.
Several novel thermophilic bacteria capable of producing enzymes of industrial interest have already been isolated from the Australian Artesian Basin, including amylases, cycloglucanotransferases (CGTases), dextranases, xylanases and cellulases.