dextral

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right-hand·ed

(rīt'hand-ĕd),
Denoting the habitual or more skillful use of the right hand for writing and most manual operations.
Synonym(s): dextral, dextromanual

dextral

/dex·tral/ (-stril) pertaining to the right side.

dextral

(dĕk′strəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or located on the right side; right.
2. Right-handed.
3. Zoology Of or relating to a gastropod shell that coils clockwise and has its aperture to the right when facing the observer with the apex upward.

dex·tral′i·ty (dĕk-străl′ĭ-tē) n.
dex′tral·ly adv.

right-hand·ed

(rīt-hand'ĕd)
Denoting the habitual or more skillful use of the right hand for writing and most manual operations.
Synonym(s): dextral.

dextral

of the right, right-handed; often applied to the right-handed coiling of a GASTEROPOD shell.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the adolescent sample, a graph of spatial mean scores across the seven hand preference classes showed a roughly 'W' shaped distribution, with best performance occurring in the middle (class 4, the presumed least dextral of right-handed writers).
It seems her interpretation of the results is that there is a heterozygote advantage that accounts for the superiority of class 4 dextral males, but a specific superiority of the rs- - genotype among sinistral males, who scored higher than class 4 males.
McManus, Shergill & Bryden (1993) studied cognitive test performances in dextral participants.
The results for the spelling test showed superior performance of the most dextral individuals, poorest performance of the most sinistral, and intermediate performance by the groups with intermediate dextrality.
Since only dextral participants were studied, the homozygote advantage hypothesis straightforwardly predicts superior performances in the less dextral.
The decision to study only dextral persons was taken when we realized the difficulty and time vista required for securing adequate numbers of male and female volunteers to constitute adequate samples of the three sinistral hand preference classes in Annett's hand preference procedure.
The prediction that strong dextrals would have lower means than other groups was not fulfilled.
To test the prediction of the (RS) theory that educational success would be lower at both extremes of the R-L continuum, and especially in strong dextrals (Annett, 1993c), the sample was divided into four quartiles for R-L hand skill differences in tracing lines (Ns = 136, 136, 135, 138) and frequencies of levels of school leaving qualifications (1 = low, 2 = medium, 3 = high) were calculated for the quartiles.
Neither the expected quadratic relationship in form of an inverted U between R-L hand skill continuum and verbal abilities (Annett & Manning, 1990a) nor the prediction that strong dextrals are at a risk of lower ability (Annett & Manning, 1989) could be confirmed.