dewlap


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dewlap

(do͞o′lăp′, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. A fold of loose skin hanging from the neck of certain animals.
2. A pendulous part similar to this, such as the wattle of a bird.
3. A fold of loose skin hanging from the neck of a person.

dewlap

loose skin under the throat and neck which may be pendulous in some species or breeds, e.g. Bloodhounds, Indian cattle, rabbits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rabbits who cannot reach the site of an irritation because of arthritis, obesity, or intervening skin folds sometimes chew at their dewlap instead and simple baldness may result, but frequently the skin also appears irritated.
Males are known to show territorialism and fight toward invading males by inflating the dewlap (Karunarathna and Amarasinghe 2008, Somaweera and Somaweera 2009).
The dewlap below the chin and the inflated nose characterise the animal as an elk.
Average 12-year-old kid Picasso Dewlap feels stranded on Cedar Island, where his family just moved.
that would have been perceived had it been present--serves to bring clearly to awareness the fact that the object should be thought, spoken of, and acted toward as non-existing, just as one is made aware that a certain thing should be called a "cow" because it possesses horns, dewlap, and udder.
Drinkers looked up from their glasses at the dewlap and the dusty nostrils.
His first TV appearance was in a BBC play, but the series ran on Thames; bringing fame to the writer and to Leo McKern, the actor who played the part with a trembling dewlap and a pickled voice.
Only large, adult males were used in the study because they are larger and more conspicuous due to their social dewlap displays.
Writing activities of a more creative variety were also assigned in conjunction with these narratives from the borderlands, in which students were invited to create their own myths of the Far North, reinforcing traditional Native American storytelling and signifying practices as they explained the origin of the aurora or the moose's dewlap, of the salmon's hooked nose or the rabbit's snowshoe feet, of the ptarmigan's changing plumage or the eagle's bald head or the grizzly's human-like hind-foot and droppings.
The drooping dewlap and horns indicate a 2-year-old animal, but the teeth (six of which are permanent) are those of a 3- to 4-year-old bull.
Beneath the moose's neck is a fleshy fold of skin called the dewlap, or bell.
DEWLAP A Fold of skin hanging from the throat B Precipitation of moisture C Morning period of exercise who am I?