devolution


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dev·o·lu·tion

(dev'ō-lū'shŭn),
A continuing process of degeneration or breaking down, in contrast to evolution.
See also: involution, catabolism.
[L. de-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll down]

devolution

(dĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, dē′və-)
n.
1. A passing down or descent through successive stages of time or a process.
2. Transference, as of rights or qualities, to a successor.
3. Delegation of authority or duties to a subordinate or substitute.
4. A transfer of powers from a central government to local units.
5. Biology Degeneration.

dev′o·lu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
dev′o·lu′tion·ist n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore it would take a lot of courage to rebel against the Conservative government's devolution plans.
The influential think tank Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) says England's counties could end up cut off from the benefits of devolution because of a "one size fits all" approach from ministers.
The 39 LEPs in England, all led by business, are working with local partners on devolution deals aimed at accelerating economic growth and creating new jobs.
Mr Blair insisted that he still believes he was right to create national assemblies in Edinburgh and Cardiff in 1999, arguing that resisting demands for the devolution of power would have stoked up demand for outright independence.
In it they set out their ambitions for a radical devolution deal which would help in developing the area as the Northern Powerhouse's export region.
On this secretary Ministry of National Health told that our ministry has been re-formed after devolution and our previous record was transferred to devolution cell.
The Local Enterprise Partnership, which I chair and which is a partnership between the public and private sectors to drive economic growth and prosperity, can and will play a key role in any devolution.
We have accepted a devolution of the NHS in ignorance, but the next step could be a privatisation
The talks could follow the template of the neighbouring Northwest Territories, whose own devolution took effect, a year after the territory reached its own agreement-in-principle with the federal government.
The Nottingham North member added that evidence gathered by MPs on demands for real devolution had been ignored by Hague.
Government must set out a timetable for devolution across England, with a pledge for immediate new powers to areas ready for them now.
Emerging as Welsh Labour's compromise response to the 2004 Richard Commission, the 2006 Act's clear aim was to break with the hitherto turbulent nature of Welsh devolution, establishing a stable and enduring settlement.