deviance


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Related to deviance: Social deviance

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn),
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. In psychiatry and the behavioral sciences, a departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule. Synonym(s): deviance
4. A statistical measure representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]

deviance

[dē′vē·əns]
Etymology: L, deviare, to turn aside
behavior that is contrary to the accepted standards of a community or culture.

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn)
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. psychiatry, behavioral sciences A departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule.
Synonym(s): deviance.
4. statistics A measurement representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]

deviance

[L. deviare, to turn aside]
A variation from the accepted norm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research suggests that the prosocial values promoted by authoritative parenting may have a similar effect on romantic infidelity as on general deviance and academic dishonesty.
Hypothesis 1: Customer aggression will be positively related to the destructive deviance of employees.
As a special form of social deviance, the juvenile delinquency is defined as "the conduct of all minors and young people in conflict with the rules of social coexistence accepted and recognized in society" (Banciu Radulescu, 2002: 7).
Workplace deviance mediates the relationship between sleep deprivation and individual performance.
A final contribution is that two of the three antecedent factors in this study are new to the workplace deviance literature.
Hypothesis 4: Contempt towards weak performers in the organization positively affects interpersonal deviance.
A within-persons approach to deviance draws on affective events theory to establish the differences between emotion- and judgment-driven behaviors.
Edwin Lemert (1967) developed the primary deviance and secondary deviance typology to explain the process by which individuals are labeled by authority figures.
Positive deviance sounded good in theory but no roadmaps existed to design an intervention.
Essays 5-6 are, in my opinion, the brightest part of this collection and focus their attention on solving the problem of causal deviance.
Infection rates were reported as events per 100 patient-months and were sequenced for analysis into three periods: 1) preintervention (January 2008-August 2009), 2) participation in the prevention program (September 2009-July 2010), and 3) participation in the program with positive deviance (August 2010-December 2011).
The purpose of this article is to offer an initial theory of workplace deviance in the family firm.