developmental psychology


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psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

de·vel·op·men·tal psy·chol·o·gy

the study of the psychological, physiologic, and behavioral changes in an organism that occur from birth to old age.

developmental psychology

n.
The branch of psychology concerned with the study of progressive behavioral changes in an individual from birth until maturity.

de·vel·op·men·tal psy·chol·o·gy

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-men'tăl sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the psychological, physiologic, and behavioral changes in an organism that occur from birth to old age.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preceding paragraphs, we have outlined a relationally integrated systems model as a way to think about integration between developmental psychology and faith, and as a theoretical model within developmental psychology that does justice to development in general and faith development in particular.
BAAF's contributions in relation to developmental psychology
On the posttest, planned comparisons yielded the same outcomes as on the pretest, with the exception that interest in clinical psychology did not significantly exceed interest in developmental psychology (p > .
My sense is that his appeal to developmental psychology, rather than providing a substantial scientific basis for his political theory, merely serves as the source of a certain jargon in which to express his theoretical position.
There is no question that feminists, childcare advocates, and their supporters in the media are much too quick to seize on any data that can be reported under a headline like "The Kids Are All Right"--such as the Developmental Psychology study mentioned above, or an earlier major study by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which received the same enthusiastic treatment on the front pages of The New York Times and The Washington Post.
The study was reported this month in Developmental Psychology, a journal of the American Psychological Association.
Tuttle's basic theoretical goal is to bring issues cultivated in developmental psychology to bear on questions of historical experience.
The video categorizes Piaget's contributions to the study of developmental psychology into four distinct periods, portraying key episodes with photographs, drawings and archival film.
The processes involved in initiating, establishing, and potentially overcoming problem behavior are vividly illustrated through new findings and theories from fields including clinical psychology, sociology, developmental psychology and criminology.
This introductory undergraduate textbook explores developmental psychology within the context of other disciplines that intersect, such as anthropology, linguistics, neuroscience, and sociology.
Developmental psychobiology is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing developmental psychology, biological psychology, neuroscience, and many other areas of biology, with particular emphasis on prenatal, perinatal, and early childhood development.

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