detrusor muscle


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detrusor muscle

The three-layered muscular wall of the urinary bladder. Nerve: primarily parasympathetic (S2-S4), secondarily sympathetic (T11-L2). Action: empties bladder.
See also: muscle

Detrusor muscle

Bladder muscle.
Mentioned in: Urine Flow Test
References in periodicals archive ?
Causes of urinary incontinence ACUTE Urinary tract infection Bacterial Inflammation Atrophic urethritis or vaginitis Bladder outlet obstruction Enlarged prostate Constipation/ Faecal impaction Pelvic organ prolapse Increased urine production Diuretic drugs Diabetes Cognitive impairment Dementia or Delirium Depression Disorientation in new environment Hypnotic, sedative or other psychoactive drug therapy Reduced mobility Accessing toilet --Illness, surgery or injury --Gait disorder --Physical restraint Removing clothing Reduced night-time vision Acute injury to pelvic floor Vaginal delivery Pelvic surgery CHRONIC Stress Pelvic floor weakness Impaired internal sphincter function Urge Overactive detrusor muscle Mixed Overflow With retention Table 3.
Oxybutynin, tolterodine, darifenacin, solifenacin, and trospium antagonize the effects of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors on the detrusor muscle and are known as antimuscarinic agents.
Coping strategies range from manually pressing on the bladder to assist in voiding to self-catheterization and injecting botulinum toxin into the detrusor muscle, a new therapy with some promising results.
Patients were randomised to receive a physician-administered single treatment of placebo, 200 or 300 Units of BOTOX[R] injected as one procedure into the detrusor muscle using a rigid or flexible cystoscope.
A transvaginal probe for near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the bladder detrusor muscle and urethral sphincter.
The reason is the abnormal contraction of the urinary detrusor muscle of the bladder.
In a recent in vitro study BP inhibited contractions induced by electrical field stimulation and relaxed carbachol-induced contractions on porcine detrusor muscle, though to a lesser extent than oxybutynin (Schuler et al.
which may lead to serious health consequences if the overactivity of the detrusor muscle is not treated.
oxybutynin, are the mainstay of treatment for the overactive bladder component of the detrusor muscle and its use in children has been validated.
Drugs acting on the detrusor muscle were discontinued three days before the day of appointment.
A hypertrophied detrusor muscle within the bladder.