detergent

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detergent

 [de-ter´jent]
1. purifying or cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.
3. in biochemistry, any of a class of agents structurally consisting of a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain and a hydrophilic polar head group, which reduce the surface tension of water, emulsify, and aid in solubilization of soil.

de·ter·gent

(dē-tĕr'jent),
1. Cleansing.
2. A cleansing or purging agent, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids (for example, quaternary ammonium or sulfonic acid compounds) that, through a surface action that depends on their possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, exert cleansing (oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects; acridine derivatives (for example, acriflavine, proflavine) as well as other dyes (for example, brilliant green, crystal violet) have detergent properties for the same reasons.
Synonym(s): detersive
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent

/de·ter·gent/ (de-ter´jent)
1. purifying, cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.
3. in biochemistry, any of a class of agents, characterized by a hydrophilic polar head group attached to a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain, which reduce the surface tension of water, emulsify, and aid in the solubilization of soil.

detergent

[ditur′jənt]
Etymology: L, detergere, to cleanse
1 a cleansing agent.
2 (in respiratory therapy) a wetting agent that is administered to mediate the removal of respiratory tract secretions from airway walls. See also surfactant.

de·ter·gent

(dĕ-tĕr'jĕnt)
A cleansing or purging agent, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids that, through a surface action that depends on their possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, exert cleansing (i.e., oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects.
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent

a substance that when dissolved in water acts as a cleansing agent for the removal of grease by altering the interfacial tension of water with other liquids or solids. Powerful detergents are used to break up oil spillages at sea.

de·ter·gent

(dĕ-tĕr'jĕnt)
A cleansing or purging agent that provides cleansing (i.e., oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects.
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent

1. purifying, cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.

anionic detergent
a substance which when dissolved contributes a hydrophobic ion which carries a negative charge to the solution. Soap is an example.
cationic detergent
the dissociated substance produces a positively charged hydrophobic ion. The quarternary ammonium compounds are the best known examples. They are innocuous if properly diluted but the concentrates are very poisonous.
nonionic surface-acting detergent
e.g. the polyoxyethylenes are regarded as nonpoisonous.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following requirements have been amended in the new Regulation to the supply of detergents and surfactants used in detergents to the market: Rules on the biodegradability of surfactants in detergent, Restrictions or prohibitions on surface active substance in terms of biodegradability, Additional information on detergent labeling.
It all started back in 2015 when The Onion published column which was written from a perspective of a child wondering what it would be like to eat the red and blue-colored detergent Tide pods, which looked like candies.
The increasing awareness about the advantages of using liquid detergents and steadily rising disposable incomes are leading to high penetration of liquid detergents in households globally.
Unilever South Africa continued to lead in various laundry care categories including standard powder detergents, standard liquid detergents, bar detergents and hand wash detergents.
Liquid detergents will surely continue to see more dynamic value growth compared to powder detergents.
0, a supplier of laundry and household cleaning products, has introduced Wash 'n Go Singles, a new unit dose detergent that gives consumers a compelling value and retailers a healthy profit margin, says Frederick Horowitz, the company's chief executive officer.
To answer this question, doctors looked at all the injuries involving laundry detergent reported in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 2012-14.
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 17, 2013-Codexis and Chemtex partnership reports scale-up of detergent alcohols from cellulosic biomass feedstock(C)2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
Overall, laundry detergents (pod and non-pod) also were associated with 175 (17%) eye, 114 (11%) skin, and 14 (1%) inhalational exposures, with no significant differences between pod-related and non-pod-related exposures among these noningestion routes of exposure.
The group of industrial and institutional laundry detergents includes: laundry detergent products used by professional users in the industrial and institutional sector.
The field study, conducted in major retail shops in Dubai, covered 104 pre-packaged containers of liquid and powder detergents.
Detergent has been used widely as a cleaning agent and growing from year to year in the country.