desynchronosis

desynchronosis

(de-sin?kro-no'sis) [? + Gr. synkhronos, same time] Jet lag.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with R&R, home leave, family getaways and the logging of welcome mileage points in the skies comes the bane of many travelers: desynchronosis syndrome, otherwise known as jet lag.
But he has been floored by the desynchronosis caused by countless trips to and from the US, including twice in the last fortnight.
EMFs can contribute to nonrestorative sleep and desynchronosis of brain waves, which disturb the carefully orchestrated symphony of neurotransmitters.
As part of our squadron's analysis of the mishap, and in an effort to better understand the extent of the impairment caused by desynchronosis, commonly known as jet lag, we used the fatigue avoidance scheduling tool (FAST) software to model the sleep of three individuals in our command.
Jetlag, also called desynchronosis, is a temporary disorder that causes a variety of temporary mental and physical impairments as a result of air travel across time zones -- common in flights to Asia and Europe, but also observed in travelers between West and East coast.
Circadian desynchronosis or jet lag occurs when our body's 24-hour internal biological clock is out of balance.
They suggest that this effect may be due to sleep desynchronosis that causes greater anxiety and hence less risk-taking behaviour in market participants.
Another name for jet lag is desynchronosis, and it is simply the temporary disruption of your body clock when you fly across several time zones.
Gauvin and colleagues have suggested that these photoperiod shifts serve as stressors, which may result in alcohol use, possibly as a means of self-medicating the desynchronosis or rhythm disruption.