desquamation


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desquamation

 [des″kwah-ma´shun]
the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets. adj., adj desquam´ative.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn),
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation

/des·qua·ma·tion/ (des″kwah-ma´shun) the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets.desquam´ative

desquamation

[des′kwəmā′shən]
Etymology: L, desquamare, to take off scales
a normal process in which the cornified layer of the epidermis is sloughed in fine scales. Certain conditions, injuries, and medications accelerate desquamation and may cause peeling and the loss of deeper layers of the skin. Also called exfoliation. desquamate, v., desquamative, adj.

desquamation

Medtalk The sloughing of a mucocutaneous surface. See Potato chip desquamation.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn)
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation

(dĕs″kwă-mā′shŭn)
1. The peeling skin characteristic of postmature infants.
Enlarge picture
DESQUAMATION OF THE SKIN OF THE PALM
2. Shedding of the epidermis. See: illustration

furfuraceous desquamation

Shedding of branlike scales.

desquamation

Shedding, peeling or scaling of skin.

Desquamation

Shedding of the cells lining the insides of the air sacs. A feature of desquamative interstitial pneumonitis.

desquamation

normal, continuous loss (shedding) of keratin flakes (squames) from the outer layer of epidermis at the skin surface, so that overall skin thickness remains constant, even though keratinocytes continually generate at the basal layer (stratum basale)

desquamation (des·kw·māˑ·shn),

n sloughing off of the cornified epidermal layer. Also called
exfoliation.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn)
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation (des´kwəmā´shən),

n a naturally occurring process in which the outer layer of skin or mucosa cells is sloughed off.

desquamation

the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
A potential role for multiple tissue kallikrein serine proteases in epidermal desquamation.
The stratum corneum chymotryptic enryme that mediates shedding and desquamation of skin cells is highly overexpressed in ovarian tumor cells.
Dry desquamation clinically presents as scaling and pruritus of irradiated skin.
Prominent desquamation was noted on the palms of her hands and the soles of her feet on the ninth day of treatment.
A maculopapular rash, also a common manifestation in up to 90% of children and 50% of adults (4,8,9,18), was prominent in these patients, lasting 2 days and followed by desquamation.
In addition, a healthcare worker reportedly had pharyngitis, a rash, and desquamation of the palms and had received a diagnosis of scarlet fever 3 weeks earlier.
The most common adverse events were desquamation and erythema.
During the examination, location and number of lesions were noted, and the following signs and symptoms were observed: erythema, edema, tenderness, itching, pain, shining skin, desquamation, hyperkeratosis, fissures, pustules, suppuration, ulcers, deformation of the toes (defined as deviation of the normal axis of the toe caused by intense swelling), deformation of nails, loss of nails, and difficulty in walking or gripping.
Typical psoriatic symptoms like itching disappear in some days, abnormal desquamation is being reduced or disappears on average in two weeks, and a healthier skin shows mostly after 6 weeks.
In this scoring system, 0 is no change, 4 is necrosis, and a score of 2 is assigned for moist desquamation, which is deemed unacceptable morbidity and a treatment failure.
There were no signs of ischemia, drainage or desquamation to the surrounding skin or incision.