desquamate

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des·qua·mate

(des'kwă-māt),
To shred, peel, or scale off, as the casting off of the epidermis in scales or shreds, or the shedding of the outer layer of any surface.
[L. desquamo, pp. -atus, to scale off, fr. squama, a scale]

desquamate

(dĕs′kwə-māt′)
intr.v. desqua·mated, desqua·mating, desqua·mates
To shed, peel, or come off in scales. Used of skin.

des′qua·ma′tion n.

desquamate

(dĕs′kwă-māt) [L. desquamare, to remove scales]
To shed or scale off the surface epithelium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amnion epithelium is thinned, desquamated on considerable extent.
Surface proteins that promote adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to human desquamated nasal epithelial cells.
Inspissated mucus and pus, blood clots, desquamated epithelium, and even ectopic teeth have all been described as endogenous sources (1).
Both are true cysts as they are lined by thin epithelium and show a lumen usually filled with desquamated keratin, and occasionally containing inflammatory cells.
Because large amounts of epithelium are in contact with the pessary, drainage holes are important to allow desquamated cells and vaginal discharge to drain.
The formation of detritus amorphous masses and various desquamated and migrated into the cell lumen continued to dominate (Figures 7, 8).
In 1854, Filippo Pacini in Florence described vibrios in the intestinal contents of cholera victims and was amazed at their large numbers in the mucus and desquamated epithelial cells.
Tongue coating, including bacteria, desquamated cells, and saliva, among others, is one of the important etiological factors of halitosis.
Squamous cells are desquamated or sloughed off, and as they die they release glycogen that is metabolized by endogenous bacteria to lactic acid, a relatively strong acid that is also protective against pathogens or disease-causing bacteria.
14) Meconium is produced after week 13 of gestation from secretions of the liver and intestinal glands, desquamated intestinal epithelium, and some amniotic fluid.
2) He proposed that pseudocysts develop when the tonsillar crypt opening becomes plugged, which results in enlargement of the tonsillar tissue secondary to an accumulation of purulent materials or desquamated cells and keratins.