desmosome


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des·mo·some

(dez'mō-sōm),
A site of adhesion between two epithelial cells consisting, in each cell, of a dense attachment plaque with associated intermediate filaments and transmembrane proteins known as cadherins.
[desmo- + G. sōma, body]

desmosome

/des·mo·some/ (dez´mo-sōm) a circular, dense body that forms the site of attachment between certain epithelial cells, especially those of stratified epithelium of the epidermis, which consist of local differentiations of the apposing cell membranes.
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Desmosome.

desmosome

[dez′məsōm]
Etymology: Gk, desmos, band, soma, body
a small, circular, dense area within the intercellular bridge that forms the site of adhesion between certain epithelial cells, especially the stratified epithelium of the epidermis. Also called macula adherens.
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Desmosome

des·mo·some

(des'mō-sōm)
A site of adhesion between two epithelial cells, consisting of a dense attachment plaque separated from a similar structure in the other cell by a thin layer of extracellular material.
Synonym(s): macula adherens.
[desmo- + G. sōma, body]

desmosome

a thickened zone in the cell membrane of adjacent eukaryote cells.

desmosome

A site of adhesion between two adjacent cells, such as in the corneal epithelium. It consists of a small, dense body in which the two halves are separated by an intercellular gap filled with extracellular substance. The basal cells are attached at irregular intervals to the underlying basement membrane (adjacent to Bowman's layer) by hemidesmosomes (one half of a desmosome). Thus, scraping off the epithelium usually leaves fragments of the basal cells attached to the basement membrane.

desmosome

the 'spot-welds' which provide one of the structural units that bind epithelial cells together. Half units are called hemidesmosomes.

desmosome core
a dense core of glycoproteins filling the space between cells which are adhered by desmosomes.
half d's
structures which provide points of adhesion to anchor cytoskeletal elements to basal cell membranes. Called also hemidesmosomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
TEHRAN (FNA)- Scientists at the University of Manchester have made an important discovery about how cells in the skin and heart are bound together through structures called desmosomes.
This corroborates with the widely accepted "desmosomal model" hypothesis (55), according to which under conditions of mechanical stress, impaired desmosome function due to desmsosmal gene mutations would lead to detachment and death of cardiac myocytes followed by inflammation and fibrofatty replacement (31).
Understanding how desmosomes function is essential for developing better treatments for these and other types of skin disease and for non-healing wounds.
The scientists observed the overproduction of inflammatory molecules (known to promote cancer), the increased survival of cells that should have committed suicide in response to excessive UVB and a loss of cell-cell adhesion commensurate with the loss of desmosomes.
Desmosomes are also thought to be involved in helping to suppress cancer.
Aspects of the structure and assembly of desmosomes.
A defect in keratinocyte desmosomes leads to keratinocyte acantholysis, which clinically manifests as fragile skin that may form vesicles and bullae (5).
Viable cells break away from their support in a complex process involving signal transduction mechanisms (from inside to outside the cell) that result in conformational changes of the extracellular domain of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes [8].
Desmosomes are points of interface between the tight junctions, and adherens junctions keep the cell membranes adhesive enough to stabilize the junctions.
These genes encode components of desmosomes (DSG2), gap junctions (CX26), tight junctions (CLDN4, CLDN7), the cornified envelope (SPRRIA, 2A, 2B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2I, 2J), intermediate filaments (KRT19), and a variety of cell-surface and extracellular-matrix glycoproteins (SPP1, BGP1, BGP2, MUC1, TROP2, CLU).
They present with extensive, recalcitrant oral and skin lesions, and on immunofluorescence, have antibodies to monkey esophageal keratinocytes, heart, lung, and other desmosomes.
For epithelioid mesotheliomas these include very long, thin apical microvilli that do not have a glycocalyx, as opposed to the generally shorter microvilli of adenocarcinomas that usually do have a glycocalyx; perinuclear tonofilament bundles; the presence of basal lamina; and long desmosomes.