desmosome

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des·mo·some

(dez'mō-sōm),
A site of adhesion between two epithelial cells consisting, in each cell, of a dense attachment plaque with associated intermediate filaments and transmembrane proteins known as cadherins.
[desmo- + G. sōma, body]

desmosome

/des·mo·some/ (dez´mo-sōm) a circular, dense body that forms the site of attachment between certain epithelial cells, especially those of stratified epithelium of the epidermis, which consist of local differentiations of the apposing cell membranes.
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Desmosome.

desmosome

[dez′məsōm]
Etymology: Gk, desmos, band, soma, body
a small, circular, dense area within the intercellular bridge that forms the site of adhesion between certain epithelial cells, especially the stratified epithelium of the epidermis. Also called macula adherens.
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Desmosome

des·mo·some

(des'mō-sōm)
A site of adhesion between two epithelial cells, consisting of a dense attachment plaque separated from a similar structure in the other cell by a thin layer of extracellular material.
Synonym(s): macula adherens.
[desmo- + G. sōma, body]

desmosome

a thickened zone in the cell membrane of adjacent eukaryote cells.

desmosome

A site of adhesion between two adjacent cells, such as in the corneal epithelium. It consists of a small, dense body in which the two halves are separated by an intercellular gap filled with extracellular substance. The basal cells are attached at irregular intervals to the underlying basement membrane (adjacent to Bowman's layer) by hemidesmosomes (one half of a desmosome). Thus, scraping off the epithelium usually leaves fragments of the basal cells attached to the basement membrane.

desmosome

the 'spot-welds' which provide one of the structural units that bind epithelial cells together. Half units are called hemidesmosomes.

desmosome core
a dense core of glycoproteins filling the space between cells which are adhered by desmosomes.
half d's
structures which provide points of adhesion to anchor cytoskeletal elements to basal cell membranes. Called also hemidesmosomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
TGF-[beta]3 induces a fibrotic response in various tissues in vivo (44) and modulate expression of genes encoding desmosomal proteins in different cell types.
For example, plakoglobin, when freed from desmosomal complexes, translocates to the nucleus where it competes and opposes the action of [beta]-catenin and downregulates the canonical Wnt/-[beta]-catenin signaling pathway.
Plakophilins together with other desmosomal proteins, assemble to form cell adhesion complexes, which carry out important functions such as mechanically safeguarding cellular and organ architecture, and participating in signal transduction pathways (53).
Desmoglein-2 (DSG-2): DSG-2 is expressed in cardiac tissue and is an important component of desmosomal complex.
Epsilon waves were observed in the probands carrying the mutation in the genes coding for the desmosomal proteins but not in the patients with TGF/3-3 gene mutation (12).
Mutations in the two non desmosomal genes, cardiac RYR-2 and TGF [beta-3] implicated in ARVD/C-2 and ARVD/C-1 exhibit different clinical presentations which are easily distinguishable from the symptoms and clinical manifestations exhibited by the desmosomal gene mutations.
The cells contained frequent desmosomal connections and the apical aspects of the cells were noted to interdigitate extensively.
Also displayed were the numerous desmosomal connections between cells and abundant cytoplasmic intermediate filaments expected of such cells.
Pemphigus autoantibodies found in patients' sera play a primary pathogenic role in inducing the loss of desmosomal adhesions between keratinocytes and causing subsequent blister formation.
Desmosomal dissolution in Grover's disease, Hailey-Hailey's disease and Darier's disease.
Ultrastructural examination of the paraffin-embedded tissue demonstrated long and thin interdigitating cytoplasmic processes and desmosomal cell junctions between adjacent cell processes (Figure 5).