desmoplasia


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Related to desmoplasia: dysplasia, adenocarcinoma, anaplasia, linitis plastica

desmoplasia

 [dez″mo-pla´zhah]
the formation and development of fibrous tissue. adj., adj desmoplas´tic.

des·mo·pla·si·a

(des-mō-plā'zē-ă),
Hyperplasia of fibroblasts and disproportionate formation of fibrous connective tissue, especially in the stroma of a carcinoma.
[desmo- + G. plasis, a molding]

desmoplasia

/des·mo·pla·sia/ (dez″mo-pla´zhah) the formation and development of fibrous tissue.desmoplas´tic

desmoplasia

A dense connective tissue reaction, usually to malignant epithelial tumours, which classically occurs in infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast, where the cells are compressed into single-cell cords (colloquially known as an “Indian filing” pattern).

des·mo·pla·si·a

(des'mō-plā'zē-ă)
Hyperplasia of fibroblasts and disproportionate formation of fibrous connective tissue, especially in the stroma of a carcinoma.
[desmo- + G. plasis, a molding]

desmoplasia

The formation and proliferation of fibrous tissue, especially in tissues surrounding a CARCINOMA.

desmoplasia

the formation and development of fibrous tissue, usually indicating that caused by neoplastic processes.

Patient discussion about desmoplasia

Q. Can cystic fibrosis patients have children? My boyfriend has cystic fibrosis, and currently he’s treated with many medications but usually healthy (other than pneumonia from hospitalization from time to time). I heard that men with cystic fibrosis can’t have children - is that true? Is there anything he can do about it?

A. WE ARE A HEALTHY COUPLE BUT MY WIFE NEVER GET PREGNANT IN 20 YEARS OF RELATIONSHIP.
I'M SO SORRY ABOUT MY ENGLISH, I'M LEARNING.

Q. Do women with cystic fibrosis have difficult pregnancy? My wife has cystic fibrosis, and after 3 year of marriage we decided we want a baby. I know that men with cystic fibrosis are usually infertile and can’t have children- is that the case also for women with cystic fibrosis? Is the pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis more problematic? Is it dangerous?

A. Before you attempt a pregnancy, you should consult her doctor to make sure she can tolerate it, because very severe disease can make the pregnancy dangerous for her. If her disease isn’t so severe, usually there are no special problems.

Q. my uncle was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis. can anyone help?

A. Pulmonary Fibrosis involves scarring of the lung. Gradually, the air sacs of the lungs become replaced by fibrotic tissue. When the scar forms, the tissue becomes thicker causing an irreversible loss of the tissue’s ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream. Traditional theories have postulated that it might be an autoimmune disorder, or the after effects of an infection, viral in nature. There is a growing body of evidence which points to a genetic predisposition. A mutation in the SP-C protein has been found to exist in families with a history of Pulmonary Fibrosis. The most current thinking is that the fibrotic process is a reaction to microscopic injury to the lung. While the exact cause remains unknown, associations have been made with the following:*Inhaled environmental and occupational pollutants, *Cigarette smoking, *Diseases such as Scleroderma, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus,*Therapeutic radiation. For full: http://www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org/ipf.htm Hope this helps.

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References in periodicals archive ?
A thick, echogenic halo around a mass is a suspicious finding because it suggests desmoplasia around a tumor.
The Wilder method (29) to detect the presence of reticulin was used to define presence or absence of desmoplasia.
In this age group, desmoplasia, as identified by reticulin-positive fibers in the tumor, is biologically distinctive from nodularity (Figure 3).
Features that are significantly more likely to be seen in MGA than in well-differentiated invasive ductal carcinomas include (1) S100 immunopositivity (Figure 3, C), (2) estrogen receptor immunonegativity (Figure 3, D), (3) lack of background desmoplasia, (4) glands of uniform size and shape with eosinophilic secretions and that are lined by cells with vacuolated cytoplasm, and (5) presence of a basement membrane (laminin- or type IV collagen-positive).
However, invasive, high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis often shows infiltrative growth, marked cytologic atypia, and desmoplasia.
For example, tumorigenic invasive melanomas may juxtapose epithelioid and fusiform cells, epithelioid and small (nevoid) cells, pigmented and nonpigmented subclones, and regions of highly variable stromal desmoplasia, angiogenesis, or tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte responses.
Morphologic Features To Distinguish Dysplasia/In Situ Carcinoma Extending into Rokitansky-Aschoff Sinuses From Invasive Carcinoma in Gallbladder Dysplasia/ In Situ Invasive Carcinoma Carcinoma Desmoplasia -- + Connection to surface epithelium + -Small to medium-sized glands in smooth muscle Dilated or long elongated gland structures Presence of luminal bile + -Mixture of benign and atypical glands Involvement of intermuscular connective tissue Involvement of the muscle itself -- + Perineural or vascular invasion -- + Abbreviations: +, likely present;-, likely absent.
In contrast, the presence of desmoplasia surrounding the epithelium in question would support the interpretation of invasive carcinoma; unfortunately, desmoplasia is not often present in invasive carcinomas, even in cases of metastatic carcinoma (Figure 2).
The mass may be very firm because of striking desmoplasia.
There is no associated tissue eosinophilia, true desmoplasia, angiolymphatic involvement, or perineural permeation in PEH, as expected in sections of surface carcinomas of the skin.
The features of benign lesions include lack of cytologic atypia, lack of desmoplasia, presence of lamina propria, rounded contours of the epithelial border, and a rim of a single layer of cells along the edge of the mucin pool (not floating in the mucin).