desire

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desire

noun A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for a state of sexual arousal; it is little used in working medical parlance.

sexual response cycle

Physiology A term that encompasses the phases of a sexual act from prearousal to denouement; the SRC is divided into 4 phases. Cf Sexual dysfunction.
Sexual Response Cycle
Desire Consists of fantasies about sexual activity, desire to engage therein
Excitement Subjective component of sexual excitement is accompanied by physiologic changes, in ♂, penile tumescence and erection, in ♀ pelvic vasocongestion, vaginal lubrication, and swelling of external genitalia
Orgasm Peaking of sexual pleasure with release of sexual tension, rhythmic contraction of perineal muscles in ♂, ejaculation, in ♀, contractions of outer13 of vagina; in both, anal sphincter contracts rhythmically
Resolution Denouement Muscle relaxation, and a sense of well-being; during resolution, ♂ are unerectable for a variable period of time; ♀ remain on 'red alert'
References in classic literature ?
Into his mind came a desire to tell her some- thing he had been determined not to tell.
The callous indifference was gone; there was now sensibility, hope, desire, and the striving for good,--a strife irregular, interrupted, suspended oft, but yet renewed again.
Big things took the place of trifling ones,--sacred sorrows of wives and mothers, pangs of fathers and husbands, self-denials, sympathies, new desire to bear one another's burdens.
My mother desires her very best compliments and regards, and a thousand thanks, and says you really quite oppress her.
It was the strain of a forsaken lady, who, after bewailing the perfidy of her lover, calls pride to her aid; desires her attendant to deck her in her brightest jewels and richest robes, and resolves to meet the false one that night at a ball, and prove to him, by the gaiety of her demeanour, how little his desertion has affected her.
Go, and say some person from Gimmerton desires to see her.
Noel Vanstone desires me to write and tell you that he proposes enjoying this fine day by taking a long drive to a place on the coast here called Dunwich.
Unlike the gold which needed nothing, and must be worshipped in close-locked solitude--which was hidden away from the daylight, was deaf to the song of birds, and started to no human tones--Eppie was a creature of endless claims and ever-growing desires, seeking and loving sunshine, and living sounds, and living movements; making trial of everything, with trust in new joy, and stirring the human kindness in all eyes that looked on her.
I'm not sure that the humanity of the reader in these cases is of such comprehensive sympathy as the novelist's, and it may well be that the novelist undertakes all such hard labour under a misapprehension of the desires of the reader, who, as a rule, I fancy, is as anxious to join the ladies as the novelist himself.
Could my weak warrant add security to the inestimable pledge of this holy pilgrim, I would pledge name and fame that Ivanhoe gives this proud knight the meeting he desires.
Anselmo was deep in love with a high-born and beautiful maiden of the same city, the daughter of parents so estimable, and so estimable herself, that he resolved, with the approval of his friend Lothario, without whom he did nothing, to ask her of them in marriage, and did so, Lothario being the bearer of the demand, and conducting the negotiation so much to the satisfaction of his friend that in a short time he was in possession of the object of his desires, and Camilla so happy in having won Anselmo for her husband, that she gave thanks unceasingly to heaven and to Lothario, by whose means such good fortune had fallen to her.
And, in fine, I could not have restrained my desires, nor remained satisfied had I not followed a path in which I thought myself certain of attaining all the knowledge to the acquisition of which I was competent, as well as the largest amount of what is truly good which I could ever hope to secure Inasmuch as we neither seek nor shun any object except in so far as our understanding represents it as good or bad, all that is necessary to right action is right judgment, and to the best action the most correct judgment, that is, to the acquisition of all the virtues with all else that is truly valuable and within our reach; and the assurance of such an acquisition cannot fail to render us contented.