desexualize

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desexualize

(dē-sĕks′ū-ăl-īz) [″ + sexus, sex]
To castrate; to remove sexual traits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the better known gay television series, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, on My Fabulous Gay Wedding gay men are not constructed as offering a desexualized queer pedagogy focussed on "teaching domesticity and care of the self to facilitate heterosexual coupling" (McCarthy 2004: 98).
That theatrical quality dwindled in the later, desexualized spin-off series.
The presence of openly gay and lesbian officers, particularly once they begin to rise through the ranks, challenges the easy, taken-for-granted homophobia of the law enforcement, and all that it has helped to foster--the nominally desexualized police workplace, the hyper-masculinized ethos of the profession, and the tacit acceptance of extra-legal violence.
Even as she is displayed as a repentant desexualized wife, the audience is reminded of Anne's adultery.
However, outside marriage, behavior between men and women must be desexualized.
As Lamas indicates early in her essay, the Virgin Mary, the desexualized mother, is the ideal--an ideal questioned in Marysa Navarro's critique of the notion of Marianismo later in the volume.
The psychological explanations for her behavior are rather pat and, also in the negative column, a number of rom-com genre cliches (everyone Jamie knows pairs up in unsurprising ``surprise'' combinations, wrong conclusions are jumped to regarding her lovers and other females, her closest confidant is a desexualized African-American guy, etc.
He claims we allow our "culture" to become desexualized by opting for roles as monogamous spouses and television decorators, which somehow lets society cast our sexuality as shameful and secret.
Perhaps that's why she passed on the catwalk option and, initially, desexualized her appearance when appearing at comedy dubs.
Her narrative emphatically resists, I would suggest, any formulation of desire which positions her as either pure, desexualized victim or aberrant, appetitive agent.
After the decline of the desexualized and over-controlled Catholic symbolic of masculinity that characterized the pre-Quiet Revolution in French-Canada, what symbolic representations are we left with?
19) It makes its revisionist scripting of black male identity, which entails a destabilization of the myth of the black rapist, contingent on a signification of white and black female rape victimization as indeterminate, the constitution of rape and lynching as competing narratives, and the representation of a desexualized (and perhaps even asexual) black masculinity.