desensitize

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desensitize

 [de-sen´sĭ-tīz]
1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz),
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

(dē-sĕn′sĭ-tīz′)
tr.v. desensi·tized, desensi·tizing, desensi·tizes
Immunology To make (an individual) nonreactive or insensitive to an antigen.

de·sen′si·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
de·sen′si·tiz′er n.

desensitize

[dēsen′sitīz]
Etymology: L, de + sentire, to feel
1 (in immunology) to render an individual insensitive or less sensitive to any of the various antigens.
2 (in psychiatry) to relieve an emotionally disturbed person of the stress of phobias and neuroses by encouraging discussion of the anxieties and the stressful experiences that cause the emotional problems involved.
3 (in dentistry) to remove or reduce the painful response of vital exposed dentin to irritating substances and temperature changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. dentistry To eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.
References in periodicals archive ?
INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & PRODUCT DEFINITIONS Study Reliability and Reporting Limitations I-1 Disclaimers I-2 Data Interpretation & Reporting Level I-2 Quantitative Techniques & Analytics I-3 Product Definitions and Scope of Study I-3 Regular I-3 Anti-Caries / Fluoride Toothpastes I-3 Whitening Toothpaste I-4 Children's Toothpaste I-4 Desensitizing Toothpaste I-4 Gum Protection Toothpaste I-4 Multi-benefit Toothpaste I-4 Tartar Control Toothpaste I-4
A 2009 Canadian clinical trial on home-use desensitizing toothpaste showed that brushing with a toothpaste containing 8 percent arginine-calcium carbonate is effective in reducing dentine hypersensitivity.
Study results revealed that those using desensitizing toothpaste were more satisfied with their whitening experience overall, and would be more willing to repeat whitening treatment in the future.
Table 22: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Desensitizing Toothpaste by Geographic Region - US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), Middle East and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ Million for Years 2001 through 2010 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-52
The desensitizing effect decreases ejaculation reflex, resulting in more satisfied sex and climax.
Ortek Therapeutics, Inc announced today that it has hired WR Hambrecht + Co as its exclusive financial advisor and has begun its formal pursuit of two New Drug Applications for BasicMints(TM) and DenClude(R) Desensitizing Dental Cream.
He blamed the disappointing returns in part on retailers having started the holiday shopping season in mid-October, which could have had a desensitizing effect on consumers.
The specific product segments analyzed are Regular, Anti-Caries, Baking Soda+Peroxide, Childrens, Desensitizing, Gum Protection, Multi-Benefit, Tartar Control, Whitening, and Others.
After a while, the cloud of innuendo has a way of desensitizing fans, so they're left not knowing for whom to cheer.
New DenClude Desensitizing Cream incorporates the same breakthrough technology used in Ortek's ProClude, a more powerful version, which is applied in-office by dental professionals.
CAO), a world leading, high-tech dental company, refutes lawsuit claims by Procter & Gamble (NYSE: PG) and affirms that the advanced technology applied to its treatment film products, including Sheer White, Sheer DesenZ and Sheer FluorX for teeth whitening, desensitizing, and fluoride treatment, respectively, is its own intellectual property.
In class, Donnerstein showed us films like "The Toolbox Murders" and told us of the desensitizing effect he thought its violence had on audiences.