desensitize

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desensitize

 [de-sen´sĭ-tīz]
1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz),
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

(dē-sĕn′sĭ-tīz′)
tr.v. desensi·tized, desensi·tizing, desensi·tizes
Immunology To make (an individual) nonreactive or insensitive to an antigen.

de·sen′si·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
de·sen′si·tiz′er n.

desensitize

[dēsen′sitīz]
Etymology: L, de + sentire, to feel
1 (in immunology) to render an individual insensitive or less sensitive to any of the various antigens.
2 (in psychiatry) to relieve an emotionally disturbed person of the stress of phobias and neuroses by encouraging discussion of the anxieties and the stressful experiences that cause the emotional problems involved.
3 (in dentistry) to remove or reduce the painful response of vital exposed dentin to irritating substances and temperature changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. dentistry To eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.
References in periodicals archive ?
25 million for Democrats, asked a star-studded crowd to consider whether violent movies and video games desensitise children who already feel alienated from their peers and their families.
There is a real danger that this naturalisation of alcohol consumption may desensitise teenagers to the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption.
Honey and rose are among the ingredients to desensitise and comfort red or blotchy complexions.
Excess chatroom use can desensitise children, expert warns:Children can become so embroiled in conversations in internet chatrooms that they are unable to separate fantasy from reality, an internet expert warned.