integration

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integration

 [in″tĕ-gra´shun]
1. assimilation; anabolic action or activity.
2. the combining of different acts so that they cooperate toward a common end; coordination.
3. constructive assimilation of knowledge and experience into the personality.
4. in bacterial genetics, assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).
bilateral integration the coordinated use of both sides of the body during activity.
integration of learning the incorporation of previously acquired concepts and behaviors into a variety of new situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.
primary integration the recognition by a child that his or her body is a unit apart from the environment; it is probably not achieved before the second half of the first year of life.
secondary integration the sublimation of the separate elements of the early sexual instinct into the mature psychosexual personality.
vertical integration the structuring of hospital services in such a manner that a continuum of care is provided.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn),
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
2. In physiology, the process of building up, as by, for example, accretion or anabolism.
3. In mathematics, the process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. In molecular biology, a recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.
[L. integro, pp. -atus, to make whole, fr. integer, whole]

integration

/in·te·gra·tion/ (in″tĕ-gra´shun)
4. assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).

integration

(ĭn′tĭ-grā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of integrating.
b. The state of becoming integrated.
2. Psychology The organization of the psychological or social traits and tendencies of a personality into a harmonious whole.

integration

[in′təgrā′shən]
Etymology: L, integrare, to make whole
1 the act or process of unifying or bringing together.
2 (in psychology) the organization of all elements of the personality into a coordinated functional whole that is in harmony with the environment, one of the primary goals in psychotherapy. It involves the assimilation of insight and the coordination of new and old data, experiences, and emotional reactions so that an effective change can occur in behavior, thinking, or feeling. See also insight. integrate, v.

integration

Informatics
The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system.
 
Molecular biology
The insertion of bases into a nucleic acid, either DNA or RNA.
 
Psychiatry
(1) The absorption of information, experiences, and emotions into the personality.
(2) The incorporation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development.
 
Vox populi
The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation.

integration

Informatics The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system Psychiatry The incorporation of new and old data, experience, and emotional capacities into the personality; also refers to the organization and amalgamation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development Vox populi The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation. See Horizontal integration, Osteointegration, Seamless integration, Vertical integration.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
See also: sensory integration
2. physiology The process of building up (e.g., accretion, anabolism).
3. mathematics The process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. molecular biology A recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.

integration

the insertion of DNA from one organism into the recipient genome of another.

integration

(1) in mathematics, the use of calculus to compute the cumulative addition of one variable with respect to another, displayed graphically as the area under the curve of one variable plotted against another; (2) the summing of different types of information; (3) in physiology, coherent function of interacting systems; (4) in society, for example in medicine or social services, the linking of different approaches or organizations.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, attachment of tissue to an alloplastic material.
2. Being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
3. In physiology, the process of building up.

integration

1. assimilation; anabolic action or activity.
2. the combining of different acts so that they cooperate toward a common end; coordination.
3. in bacterial genetics, assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).

industrial integration
integration of the various levels of an industry so that they are all working in unison, usually under the same ownership. Thus in the poultry industry it is commonplace for the same company to grow the feed, hatch the chickens, franchise feeders, slaughter the broiler output in their own plant and wholesale the dressed birds to retailers.

Patient discussion about integration

Q. My child is suffering from autism and was told to have Auditory Integration Therapy…what is it?

A. An Alternative Treatments where the child listens to different sounds with the goal to improve on language comprehension and it helps receive more balanced sensory input from the environment they live in. It has been reported that children had significant behavioral and language gains after this treatment.

Q. How can I get my son into a normal school? He was diagnosed as autistic but he is intelligent and is able to go through normal education. But I don’t want him to be socially disconnected…

A. If done in a proper way it can be an excellent idea! Your son will flourish and will develop as best as he can. But if just moving him to a regular school without any preparation to him, class and teacher- that can end up very bad. So talk to the teacher the headmaster and councilor explain and work up a plan. Then it must be explained to the class. and don’t forget your son…he needs to understand that he might get unpleasant reactions sometimes.

More discussions about integration
References in periodicals archive ?
Leaving the desegregation orders in place, he nevertheless acknowledged that the state's data showed that vouchers were promoting racial balance and said he did not want to scuttle the program.
In recent years, many Southern universities have paused to reflect on the 50th anniversaries of their desegregations.
Furthermore, the legal action asserted, Louisiana "did not evaluate the impact the vouchers would have on the desegregation process in any of the school districts operating under a federal desegregation order.
As the UCLA political scientist Gary Orfield points out, "On some measures the racial achievement gaps reached their low point around the same time as the peak of black-white desegregation in the late 1980s.
1/2[cedilla] The Court of Appeals affirmed the lower court's ruling establishing the continuing need for desegregation and educational equity efforts in the Pulaski County School District and reversed the lower court's termination of state funding.
Fairclough argues at various points that black teachers were the most important figures in the black community in the century from Emancipation to desegregation, finally asserting that "during the classic age of segregation black teachers did far more than black ministers to breed dissatisfaction with, and opposition to, racial discrimination" (p.
While our industry is not undergoing anything as significant as a desegregation battle, there is still the same fear of change, anger, confusion, as well as the sense that we are victims of outside forces.
Advocates have also pointed out that without desegregation, public schools will mimic the severe racial segregation that happens in housing because of institutional racism.
Kruse traces a direct line between obscure neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klan terrorists operating against residential desegregation in post World War II Atlanta, to the leaders of the conservative movement that dominates every level of American politics today, many of whom, including Newt Gingrich, have represented metropolitan Atlanta constituencies.
This historic ruling led to the desegregation of public schools "with all deliberate speed.
Norbert College) is a close study of educational policy under presidents from Lyndon Johnson through Bill Clinton, especially concentrating on the issues of public school aid, private (particularly Catholic) school aid, and school desegregation, with concern as to the proper role of the federal government in education.
31, 2007, if grace-period assets are no longer associated with the payment of nonqualified deferred compensation, either under the plan's terms or through the dissolution of a trust or desegregation of assets, the plan will be treated as having complied with Sec.