descriptive epidemiology


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Related to descriptive epidemiology: analytical epidemiology, experimental epidemiology

epidemiology

 [ep″ĭ-de″me-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the study of the factors determining and influencing the frequency and distribution of disease, injury, and other health-related events and their causes in a defined human population for the purpose of establishing programs to prevent and control their development and spread. Also, the sum of knowledge gained in such a study.
analytic epidemiology the second stage in an epidemiologic study, in which hypotheses generated in the descriptive phase are tested.
descriptive epidemiology the first stage in an epidemiologic study, in which a disease that has occurred is examined. Data necessary in this phase include time and place of occurrence and the characteristics of the persons affected. Tentative theories regarding the cause of the disease are advanced and a hypothesis is formulated.

descriptive epidemiology

the first stage of epidemiological investigation. It focuses on describing disease distribution by characteristics relating to time, place, and person.

descriptive epidemiology

see descriptive epidemiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robust descriptive epidemiology, a thorough environmental investigation, and the hypothesis-generation phase become even more essential.
In this issue of the Journal, Forrester and Merz (2) present a descriptive epidemiology of cystic hygroma.
The steps to be followed for the outbreak investigation starting from descriptive epidemiology, the diagnosis with clinical features of the illness, determining the aetiology, etc.
Now in its third edition, Epidemiology for Public Health Practice has become a favorite textbook for undergraduate and graduate students new to epidemiology by providing a comprehensive look at all the major topics of the discipline--from study designs and descriptive epidemiology to quantitative measures and terminology.
Descriptive epidemiology as well as cross-matching of available records were also performed to identify common factors associated with [greater than or equal to] 2 foci and to establish potential flow of events.
Using this scheme, we would suggest that the outbreak is "possibly" associated with drinking water since the descriptive epidemiology is compatible with a waterborne route and the copper was found in sufficiently high concentrations in the water to cause the symptoms described.
Now in its third edition, Epidemiology for Public Health Practice has become a favorite textbook for undergraduate and graduate students new to epidemiology by providing a comprehensive look at all major topics--from study designs and descriptive epidemiology to quantitative measures and terminology.
Public Health Laboratory Service guidelines strongly associated this outbreak with the water supply because Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in treated water and the descriptive epidemiology suggested that drinking tap water was the only common factor linking the cases (6).
Descriptive epidemiology of the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in Great Britain: the first five months.