descensus


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Related to descensus: descensus uteri, descensus testis

descensus

 [de-sen´sus] (pl. descen´sus) (L.)
downward displacement or prolapse.
descensus tes´tis normal migration of the testis from its fetal position in the abdominal cavity to its location within the scrotum, usually during the last 3 months of gestation.
descensus u´teri prolapse of uterus.

de·scen·sus

(dē-sen'sŭs), The plural of this word is descensus, not descensi.
A falling away from a higher position.
See also: ptosis, procidentia.
Synonym(s): descent (1)
[L.]

descensus

/des·cen·sus/ (de-sen´sus) pl. descen´sus   [L.] downward displacement or prolapse.

descensus

[disen′səs]
the process of falling or descending. Also called prolapse.

de·scen·sus tes·tis

(dĕ-sen'sŭs tes'tis) [TA]
Descent of the testis from the abdomeninto the scrotum during the seventh and eighth months of intrauterine life.
See also: ptosis, procidentia
Synonym(s): descensus, descent (1) .

descensus

pl. descensus [L.] downward displacement or prolapse.

descensus testis
normal migration of the testis from its fetal position in the abdominal cavity to its location within the scrotum.
descensus uteri
prolapse of the uterus.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Consideration of the New Testament narrative of the descent and the chronology of liturgical time for its proclamation is taken up in Joachim Jeremias, "Zwischen Karfreitag und Ostern: Descensus und Ascensus in der Karfreitagstheologie des Neuen Testamentes," Zeitschrift fur die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft und die Kunde der alteren Kirche 42 (1949) 194-201, and Heinz-Jurgen Vogels, Christi Abstieg ins Totenreich und das Lauterungsgericht an den Toten: Eine bibeltheologisch-dogmatische Untersuchung zum Glaubensartikel `descendit ad inferos' (Freiburg: Herder, 1976).
1 (Paris, 1924) 565-619; Gerard-Henry Baudry, "Le Retour d'Adam au Paradis, symbole du salut d'humanite," Melanges de science religieuse 51 (1994) 117-47; Raniero Cantalamessa, "Il descensus ad inferos," in L'omelia `In S.
Worth noting, in particular, is that when the noun descensus (or its declined variants) was followed by the preposition ad, inferos was almost always used by Thomas.
Entry into the anterior cul-de-sac can now be performed easily with better uterine 1 descensus and visualization of the peritoneal fold (Image 6).
The surgeon must persist with morcellation as long as descensus of the uterus is continually achieved.
The Gospel of Nicodemus and Sermo CLX present a vivid descensus narrative by means of incorporating an Old Testament authority, Psalm 23 (Vulgate numbering; Psalm 24 AV).
The prolix, even rhapsodic prayers of the Gallican rite affirm the theological contextuality of the descensus in which the same humanitatis genitor, Adam, is named as the one extracted"from depths of infernal dirt" by Christ, the one "who descended" as the agent of this blessed release.
It also forgot the Latin poet Virgil's warning about a slippery slope: "|Facilis descensus Averno.
In suggesting that one must get both literally and figuratively to the bottom of things, Ferrantes' novels pay homage to a far more ancient topos, the katabasis or descensus ad inferos, the journey below made for the sake of knowledge.
12) Descensus Astraeae, in The Life and Minor Works of George Peele, ed.
Similarly, in Descensus Astraea (1591), Peele presents Elizabeth as Astraea, the goddess of justice, who has returned to England to usher in the golden age despite the attempts of Catholic villains to defeat her.
The anti-Catholicism and anti-Hispanic sentiments expressed in Descensus Astraea and Farewell are also present in his plays, The Battle of Alcazar (1589?