derris


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Related to derris: Derris elliptica

derris

powdered root of plants of the genus Derris of the family Leguminosae. Used as an insecticide and source of rotenone and rotenoid compounds. See also rotenone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Derris trifoliata stems were collected in April 2002 at the Mangrove Research Station in Nakhon Si Thammarat province, Thailand.
The freshly procured Derris roots had to immediately undergo the cleaning process to remove dirt and soil.
Effects of root extract from Derris (Derris elliptica Benth) on mortality and detoxification enyzme levels in the Diamondback Moth Larvae (Plutella xylostella Linn.
The employed technique could be further developed to acquire a liquid crude extract that has high purity of rotenone and low impurities from local Derris species with the standard of USP (U.
Next year, you could spray your blackberries when the first flowers open (timing is crucial) with derris or fenitrothion, Spray at dusk, to minimise damage to bees.
Use a puffer pack of a safe insecticide such as Derris dust to eliminate the pests now, when they are relatively inactive.
If you can catch the attack early in the year regular picking off may suffice, but it is generally easier and more effective to spray with a contact insecticide such as derris, fenitrothion or Sybol.
His conversations with Redlands students in 2011 formed the basis of his book, The Heart is Noble: Changing the World from the Inside and Out (Shambala, 2013), which was co-edited by Derris.
Figure 3 shows the yield of rotenone in dried roots extracted using normal soaking extraction (NSE) process of different types of solvents and locations of collected Derris plant.
Derris based sprays are most effective although other products recommended for caterpillars work.
Between this period and World War II, inorganic and biological substances, such as Paris green, lead arsenate, calcium arsenate, selenium compounds, lime-sulfur, pyrethrum, thiram, mercury, copper sulfate, derris, and nicotine were used, but the amounts and frequency of use were limited, and most pest control employed cultural methods such as rotations, tillage, and manipulation of sowing dates.