dermorphin


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dermorphin

A hepta-peptide first isolated from the skin of South American frogs of the genus Phyllomedusa (e.g., P sauvagei), which is a highly potent opioid agonist with selectivity for mu opioid receptors. It is 30–40 times more potent than morphine but less likely to produce drug tolerance and addiction. It has been used illegally in horse racing as it deadens pain, allowing horses to run even if injured.
References in periodicals archive ?
A QUARTER-HORSE trainer in Oklahoma has been suspended for 100 years - albeit 80 of them a suspended sentence - in the latest penalty handed down for dermorphin positives in the US.
Dermorphin, commonly known as frog juice because it occurs naturally in the skin of a South American frog, is a powerful painkiller, said to be 40 times more powerful than morphine.
The structure determination of: (i) dermorphin (the first example of a Vertebrate peptide with a D-aminoacid in its sequence)) (ii) sauvagine (an amphibian polypeptide analogue to the corticotropin-releasing factor (=CRF); the structure elucidation of sauvagine has anticipated that of CRH) represent two relevant scientific results.
Doping officials in major racing jurisdictions are on alert following a rash of positive tests in the US in recent weeks for the illegal painkiller dermorphin, known colloquially as 'frog juice' because it occurs naturally in the skin of a South American frog.
Like those other substances, dermorphin is a potent painkiller, an opioid reckoned to be 30 or 40 times stronger than morphine.
As soon as you call out dermorphin, they will try something else.
Such is the response of one US racetrack veteran when asked if he knows anything about dermorphin - frog juice, in common parlance - the illegal substance at the centre of a number of positive tests in the States in recent weeks since a test was developed to detect the drug.
A general pain suppressant said to be 40 times as potent as morphine, dermorphin can also be manufactured synthetically according to the New York Times, which broke news of its widespread use.
Craig Stevens, a professor of pharmacology at Oklahoma State University, told the NY Times of the potential effects of dermorphin.