dermatophytosis


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Related to dermatophytosis: pityriasis versicolor

dermatophytosis

 [der″mah-to-fi-to´sis]
1. any superficial fungal infection caused by a dermatophyte and involving the stratum corneum of the skin, hair, and nails, including onychomycosis and the various forms of tinea. Called also epidermomycosis and epidermophytosis.

der·ma·to·phy·to·sis

(der'mă-tō-fī-tō'sis),
An infection of the hair, skin, or nails caused by any one of the dermatophytes. The lesions may occur at any site on the body and, on the skin, are characterized by erythema, small papular vesicles, fissures, and scaling. Common sites of infection are the feet (tinea pedis), nails (onychomycosis), and scalp (tinea capitis). Compare: dermatomycosis.

dermatophytosis

/der·ma·to·phy·to·sis/ (der″mah-to-fi-to´sis)
1. epidermomycosis; any superficial fungal infection caused by a dermatophyte and involving the stratum corneum of the skin, hair, and nails, including onychomycosis and the various forms of tinea.

dermatophytosis

(dûr′mə-tō′fī-tō′sĭs)
n.
A fungal infection of the skin, especially athlete's foot.

dermatophytosis

[dur′mətō′fītō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, derma + phyton, plant, osis, condition
a superficial fungus infection involving the stratum corneum of the skin, hair, and nails, caused by Microsporum, Epidermophyton, or Trichophyton species of dermatophyte. On the trunk and upper extremities it is commonly called "ringworm" infection and is characterized by round or oval scaly patches with slightly raised borders and clearing centers. On the feet small vesicles, cracking, itching, scaling, and often secondary bacterial infections occur and are commonly called "athlete's foot." Treatment includes topical antifungal agents, as tolnaftate, clotrimazole, and undecylenic acid, and oral griseofulvin. Fingernails and toenails respond poorly to topical treatment. Also called epidermomycosis. See also tinea.
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Dermatophytosis
A skin infection by mould-like fungi known as dermatophytes—e.g., Trichophyton rubrum, T mentagrophytes, Microsporium canis, M gypsum, rarely also Epidermophyton spp; in children, T canis is the most common agent
DiffDx Nonfungal dermatopathies—e.g., erythema annulare, ‘herald patch’ of pityriasis rosea, atopic dermatitis, other dermatitides
Management Most resolve without therapy—otherwise, miconazole; if severe, griseofulvin

der·ma·to·phy·to·sis

(dĕr'mă-tō-fī-tō'sis)
An infection of the hair, skin, or nails caused by any one of the dermatophytes. The lesions are characterized by erythema, small papular vesicles, fissures, and scaling. Common sites of infection are the feet (tinea pedis), nails (onychomycosis), and scalp (tinea capitis).
Compare: dermatomycosis

dermatophytosis

A general term for fungus infection of the skin, often called TINEA or ‘ringworm’.

dermatophytosis

inflammation of skin, nails and hair follicles due to dermatophyte infection, causing erythema, itching, papular vesiculation, interdigital and heel fissures and skin scaling; superficial infections are common in adults, especially those with dyshidrosis, living in community, using communal sports or bathing facilities, diabetics or those on long-term antibiotic or immunosuppressive therapies (see onychomycosis; tinea pedis; Table 1)
Table 1: Treatment of fungal infections of skin and nails
Infection siteAgent
Antimycotic agent (for the treatment of dermatophytosis)
SkinTopical allylamine (e.g. 1% terbinafine cream for 7 days)
Topical imidazoles (e.g. 2% miconazole or 1% clotrimazole for 28 days)
Topical 0.25% amorolfine
Topical 1% econazole
Topical griseofulvin spray (400 μg puff daily for 14 days)
Topical 1% sulconazole
Topical tea tree (manuka) oil
Topical undecenoate (20% zinc undecenoate + 5% undecenoic acid)
Topical Whitfield's ointment (6% benzoic acid + 3% salicylic acid)
Other topicals include: weak iodine solution 2.5%; potassium permanganate paint 1%; salicylate acid cream or alcoholic solution 3-5%; benzoic acid (Whitfield's) ointment; sodium polymetaphosphate dusting powder
Systemic terbinafine (250 mg daily for 2 weeks)
Systemic itraconazole (100 mg daily for 15 days)
Systemic griseofulvin (500 mg daily )
NailTopical amorolfine 0.25% lacquer as an adjunct to systemic treatment
Topical borotannic acid complex acid; Phytex paint (1.46% salicylic acid + 4.89% tannic acid + 3.12% boric acid)
Topical 28% tioconazole lacquer
Topical undecenoate lacquer; Monphytol paint (5% methyl undecenoate + 0.7% propyl undecenoate + 3% salicylic acid + 25% methyl salicylate + 5% propyl salicylate + 3% chlorambucil)
Other topicals: strong iodine 10% solution
Systemic terbinafine (250 mg daily for 12-16 weeks)
Systemic itraconazole (400 mg for 1 week in a month, repeated overall 3 or 4 times)
Anticandidal agent (for the treatment of candidiasis)
SkinTopical antimycotic creams (1% clotrimazole; 1% econazole; 2% miconazole)
Topical nystatin (100 000 units ± 1% tolnaftate)
Antipityriasis versicolor agent (for the treatment of pityriasis versicolor)
SkinTopical 2% ketoconazole
Topical 2.5% selenium sulphide
Topical antimycotic agents (1% clotrimazole; 1% econazole; 2% miconazole; 1% sulconazole; 1% terbinafine)
Systemic fluconazole/itraconazole/ketoconazole/miconazole/voriconazole

dermatophytosis

fungal infection of the skin caused by one of the pathogenic genera, Microsporum, Trichophyton or Epidermophyton; see also ringworm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 51: Dermatophytosis Therapeutics Market, Global, Prescription Population (million), 2002-2017 83
06 Table 2: methionine amounts in normal and patients to dermatophytosis sera methionine Normal 28.
The control group consisted of 30 age matched male volunteers with no pervious history of dermatophytosis.
Dermatophytosis is one of the dermal mycosis that results from the group of fungus actions in the keratinized tissue (such as hair, nail, and skin keratinized tissue) that called dermatophytes.
Verna S, Heffernan MP: Superficial fungal infection: dermatophytosis, onychomycosis, tinea nigra, piedra .
Potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparation was used to confirm Dermatophytosis.
Problem Morphology Hyperplastic or Squamous cell carcinoma Neoplastic Conditions Inclusion cyst/epidermoid cyst Foreign body reaction Callus Verrucous hyperplasia Disruption of Skin Integrity Wound dehiscence Irritation/abrasion Blister/erosion/ulcer Follicular and Pseudofollicular Folliculitis Inflammation Miliaria rubra Interfollicular Inflammation Eczema craquele Dermatophytosis Allergic contact dermatitis Irritant dermatitis Infection Cellulitis Table 5.
Communicable diseases can be broken down into five different categories: respiratory diseases (common cold and pneumonia), intestinal diseases (dysentery, cholera, typhoid, paratyphoid fevers), insect borne diseases (malaria, typhus, yellow fever, dengue), sexually transmitted diseases (syphilis, gonorrhea, chancroid, AIDS), and miscellaneous diseases (tetanus, rabies, dermatophytosis, tuberculosis).