dermatochalasis


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der·ma·to·cha·la·sis

(der'mă-tō-kă-lā'sis),
A congenital or acquired condition characterized by deficient elastic fibers of the skin, which may hang in folds; vascular anomalies may be present; inheritance is either autosomal dominant or recessive, the latter sometimes in association with pulmonary emphysema and diverticula of the alimentary tract or bladder. The dominant form is caused by mutation in the elastin gene (ELN) on 7q. There is also an X-linked form that is due to mutation in the Menkes gene (MNK), encoding copper-transporting ATPase on Xq.
[dermato- + G. chalasis, a loosening]

der·ma·to·cha·la·sis

(dĕr'mă-tō-kal'ă-sis)
An acquired condition characterized by undue looseness or pendulousness of the eyelid skin due to degeneration of elastic fibers.
Synonym(s): cutis laxa [TA] , pachydermatocele, blepharochalasis.
[dermato- + G. chalasis, a loosening]

dermatochalasis

(dĕr″mă-tō-kă-lā′sĭs) [ dermato- + Gr. chalasis, relaxation]
Loose or sagging soft tissue in the eyelids, esp. the upper eyelid. It results from loss of tissue elasticity and is more prevalent in older people.

dermatochalasis

A condition in which there is a redundancy of the skin of the upper eyelids. It is often associated with a protrusion of fat through a defective orbital septum. The condition occurs usually in old people. The excess skin may cause pseudoptosis. In severe cases it may obstruct vision. Treatment is surgical. Syn. ptosis adiposa; ptosis atrophica. See blepharochalasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
For some patients it is a cosmetic concern, but functional dermatochalasis also affects the visual field, interfering with normal vision.
Caution should be exercised when administering Dysport to patients with surgical alterations to the facial anatomy, excessive weakness or atrophy in the target muscle(s), marked facial asymmetry, inflammation at the injection site(s), ptosis, excessive dermatochalasis, deep dermal scarring, thick sebaceous skin or the inability to substantially lessen glabellar lines by physically spreading them apart.
Ptosis is often diagnostically confused with dermatochalasis, where only excess skin hangs down (Figure 1), as opposed to downward displacement of the actual eyelid margin, as seen in ptosis.
39) The use of these techniques depends on the degree of facial asymmetry, brow ptosis, dermatochalasis, and skin laxity.