dermatitis artefacta

der·ma·ti·tis ar·te·fac·'ta

self-induced skin lesions resulting from habitual rubbing, scratching or hair-pulling, malingering, or mental disturbance.

dermatitis artefacta

Self-inflicted injury to the skin, usually from deliberate and prolonged scratching, but sometimes by the use of irritating substances or even sharp instruments. There is usually an underlying emotional problem but the motive may be to avoid work or obtain industrial compensation. The condition is commoner in females than in males. When the cause has been detected and removed, recovery is usually rapid but, later, other disorders may be simulated. There is a high incidence of suicide in such cases.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Skin-picking disorders and dermatitis artefacta are examples of self-inflicted skin damage associated with a person's psychological state.
Dermatitis artefacta and trichotillomania were seen in 3.
Due to immature personality, dermatitis artefacta is commonly seen in adolescents and in this patient wants to get attention of others.
Dermatitis artefacta (DA) is a deliberate and conscious self-inflicted cutaneous injury.
Self-induced skin lesions: a review of dermatitis artefacta.
Dermatitis artefacta is a form of factitious disorder, an intentional self-inflicted dermatitis difficult to diagnose.
Dermatitis artefacta este o forma de patomimie, o afectiune auto-indusa, dificil de diagnosticat.
Skin lesions heal after 10-12 days, with transient post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation; they may be confused with allergic or irritant-contact dermatitis, thermal burns, herpes zoster, dermatitis artefacta, herpes simplex, bullous impetigo and phytophotodermatitis.
Harman M, Akdeniz S, Bayram Y: Dermatitis artefacta.
Factitial dermatitis, also known as dermatitis artefacta, is a psychodermatologic disorder in which patients damage their skin but deny their self-involvement.
Factitious disorders (FDs), also known as dermatitis artefacta or pathomimia, describe a set of faked of self-inflicted skin lesions created without a clear external incentive.