dermatitis artefacta

der·ma·ti·tis ar·te·fac·'ta

self-induced skin lesions resulting from habitual rubbing, scratching or hair-pulling, malingering, or mental disturbance.

dermatitis artefacta

Self-inflicted injury to the skin, usually from deliberate and prolonged scratching, but sometimes by the use of irritating substances or even sharp instruments. There is usually an underlying emotional problem but the motive may be to avoid work or obtain industrial compensation. The condition is commoner in females than in males. When the cause has been detected and removed, recovery is usually rapid but, later, other disorders may be simulated. There is a high incidence of suicide in such cases.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Skin lesions heal after 10-12 days, with transient post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation; they may be confused with allergic or irritant-contact dermatitis, thermal burns, herpes zoster, dermatitis artefacta, herpes simplex, bullous impetigo and phytophotodermatitis.
Harman M, Akdeniz S, Bayram Y: Dermatitis artefacta.
Soong TKW, Soong W, Samsudin A, Soong F, Sharma V, O'Donnell N: Periocular dermatitis artefacta in a child .
Van Moffaert MM: The spectrum of dermatological self-mutilation and self-destruction including dermatitis artefacta and neurotic excoriations.
Harper JI, Copeman PW: Dermatitis artefacta presenting as a vasculitis.
A retrospective analysis of 57 patients with dermatitis artefacta seen in dermatological department.
Ozmen M, Erdogan A, Aydemir EH, Oguz O: Dissociative identity disorder presenting as dermatitis artefacta.
To the editor: Dermatitis artefacta is one of the self-induced dermatological disorders, which is also referred to as a variant of the obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Thus eventually the diagnosis of dermatitis artefacta was established.
Dermatitis artefacta is a rarely encountered factitious disease with wide-ranging morphologic features.
There are both medical and nonmedical therapeutic approaches to dermatitis artefacta.
Dermatitis artefacta presenting as a basal cell carcinoma--an important clinical sign missed.