derivative

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de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv),
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.

derivative

/de·riv·a·tive/ (dĕ-riv´ah-tiv) a chemical substance produced from another substance either directly or by modification or partial substitution.

derivative

[dəriv′ətiv]
Etymology: L, derivare, to turn away
anything that originates in another substance or object. For example, organs and tissues are derivatives of the primordial germ cells. Chemical derivatives may be produced to confirm identification of a compound or to aid in the analysis of a compound.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound produced from another compound in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.

derivative

the result of the calculation (usually with calculus) of the change of one variable with respect to another. Also alludes to the number of 'steps' of calculus required (e.g. acceleration is the second derivative of displacement with respect to time). See also differentiation.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
Chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps.

derivative (dēriv´ətiv),

n a chemical substance that is the result of a chemical reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
WHILE HAROLD BLOOM FAMOUSLY LABELED THE AGRICULTURAL LABORER and poet John Clare a "Wordsworthian shadow," most critics have challenged the notion of Clare's derivativeness, arguing that his poems offer a new way of representing nature.
Her focus on derivativeness indicates to us how we can both avoid the position that the causal "because" is truth-functional and yet still hold that causal statements are really explanatory.
To go down this path (and some reviewers have) leaves us with little else to say about the book other than that it highlights in a readable, fast-paced way the centrally important issue of overconsumption, but is marked by bland derivativeness, simplism and a cavalier approach to conventions of evidence.
Facts for Visitors takes a perverse pleasure in teetering on the boundary between outright derivativeness and coy experimentation.
And while this can't help but hold your attention, the pleasant surprise is that - despite its burlesque, derivativeness and simplistic sermonizing - ``Diary'' comes up with some fascinating character bits.
Optimistic by nature, however, I have always held that not even the archness, the derivativeness, the fundamental unseriousness of postmodern art can prevent that art from having, like any other, its master practitioners.
However, for any experienced student of South African literature, the novel will disappoint by its derivativeness and predictability.