derivation

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Related to derivational: Derivational morpheme

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn),
1. The source or process of an evolution. Synonym(s): revulsion
2. The drawing of blood or body fluids to one part to relieve congestion in another.
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn)
The source, origin, or evolutionary course of a structure or process.
Synonym(s): revulsion (2) .
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]

derivation

(dĕr″ĭ-vā′shŭn) [L. derivare, to draw off]
The source or origin of a substance or idea.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis of the derivational affix -nika shows that the S3 rhyme in the pentasyllabic words is similar to that found in the tetrasyllabic words (127-148 ms).
In addition, despite the broad range of initial levels (early within word patterns to late derivational relations), all students were able to make an upward movement through the spelling stages (see Table 4).
Stages of orthographic development Tier Stage Content Sample Alphabetic Emergent Left-to-right B Basic alphabet b Sounds for letters k (written for cat) Alphabetic Letter-name One-syllable words cat, hat, pat, mat Short vowels short a, e, i, o, u Pattern Blends, digraphs pl-, br-, ch, sh Pattern Within-word One-syllable words coat, white, grown Long vowels and other a/ai/ay/a-e vowel patterns str-, kn-, dge/ge, tch/ch Complex consonant clusters Pattern Syllables Two-syllable words cotton, pumpkin & affixes Syllable division Record/record Meaning Simple prefixes and un-, re-, dis-, -ly, suffixes -ing Meaning Derivational Multiple syllable predictable, associate Relations words Latin and Greek roots spect, vis, struct, port Complex affixes ence/ance, ible/able Table 2.
We note examples with the same derivational structure, like Hz Ng bisqa 'saliva' : Ys mesqe, musqe 'same' (L 83) (B 56), with the b:m alternation, most likely from the zero-grade of IE *meus-, *meug'damp; slimy, slippery, with derivatives referring to various wet or slimy substances' (Wat 55) (IEW 744-5) + the suffix -ka.
The elimination of any level of representation (such as S-Structure) or of any representational vocabulary (such as c-command) can be seen as an aspect of the "strongest minimalist thesis" under the assumption that derivations and derivational vocabulary (such as Merge) are still needed.
In die artikel, Derivational relations in English, Czech and Zulu wordnets, beskryf Bosch, Fellbaum en Pala inisiatiewe om morfologiese en semantiese reelmatighede in Engels, Tsjeggies en isiZulu vas te vang ten einde dit in die rekenaarmatige verwerking en konstruering van woordnette te gebruik, veral vir isiZulu en die ander Bantoetale.
Two of these categorically determine gender assignment when present: (1) the biological sex of the referent and (2) the presence of a derivational suffix (or a sequence which can be interpreted as such), additionally, gender assignment for these Anglicisms responds variably to three other factors: (3) the terminal phoneme(s) of the loanword, (4) the gender of a common Spanish synonym, and (5) the gender of the Spanish hyperonym.
The final section of the grammatical description is a substantial chapter on word derivation and compounding, one of the fullest accounts of derivational morphology to be found in modern Polynesian grammars.
Culture, analysed and specified ontologically, has a single main advantage over ontic and derivational "theories of culture" (for example, those that derive culture from ideas about nature, economy, climate, topography, society, state, genius, spirit, world picture and so on), over the "philosophy of culture" (156e/167g), and over all necessarily positivistic accounts of specific cultural "objects" (including ethnographies, participant observations, data collections, interviews and so on).
Acquisition of derivational morphology proceeds similar to that of hearing children.
In the beginning of Chapter 1 of his Complete Works, Arsuzi states: "The Arabic language has a derivational structure.