deprivation of sleep effects

deprivation of sleep effects

Etymology: L, deprivare, to deprive; ME, slep + L, efficere, to accomplish
the result of interference with a basic physiological urge to sleep, which appears to be governed by sleep centers in the hypothalamus and reticular activating system. The loss of sleep for 24 hours usually has no significant effect on physical or mental functioning. However, sleep deprivation results in progressive mental aberrations after 30 to 60 continuous hours. After this point, boring tasks become intolerable, speech begins to be slurred, and performance becomes increasingly poor. After a week of sleep deprivation, symptoms of psychosis may appear.