deprivation


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Related to deprivation: sensory deprivation, Sleep deprivation

deprivation

 [dep-rĭ-va´shun]
loss or absence of parts, organs, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience, usually in the early developmental years.
maternal deprivation the result of premature loss or absence of the mother or of lack of proper mothering; see also maternal deprivation syndrome.
sensory deprivation a condition in which an individual receives less than normal sensory input. It can be caused by physiological, motor, or environmental disruptions. Effects include boredom, irritability, difficulty in concentrating, confusion, and inaccurate perception of sensory stimuli. Auditory and visual hallucinations and disorientation in time and place indicate perceptual distortions due to sensory deprivation. Symptoms can be produced by solitary confinement, loss of sight or hearing, paralysis, and even by ordinary hospital bed rest.
sleep deprivation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as prolonged periods of time without sleep (sustained, natural, periodic suspension of relative consciousness).
thought deprivation blocking (def. 2).

dep·ri·va·tion

(dep'ri-vā'shŭn),
Absence, loss, or withholding of something needed.

deprivation

/dep·ri·va·tion/ (dep-rĭ-va´shun) loss or absence of parts, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation  deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience in the early development years.
sensory deprivation  deprivation of usual external stimuli and the opportunity for perception.

deprivation

[dep′rivā′shən]
Etymology: L, deprivare, to deprive
the loss of something considered valuable or necessary by taking it away or denying access to it. In experimental psychology, animal or human subjects may be deprived of something desired or expected for study of their reactions.

deprivation

The complete or nearly complete lack of direct access to adequate amenities, housing, employment opportunities etc. Levels of deprivation can be assessed with the standard Townsend measurement, which is based on car ownership, property ownership, unemployment and overcrowding.

dep·ri·va·tion

(dep'ri-vā'shŭn)
Absence, loss, or withholding of something needed.

deprivation

Failure to obtain or to be provided with a sufficiency of the material, intellectual or spiritual requirements for normal development and happiness.

Deprivation

A condition of having too little of something.
Mentioned in: Shock

deprivation

loss or absence of parts, organs, powers or things that are needed.

deprivation test
see water deprivation test.

Patient discussion about deprivation

Q. what are the affects of sleep deprivation, and can I counteract them? I’m a college student and I’ve been sleeping for 5-6 hours a night for the past month…what symptoms should I expect? And how can I counteract them?

A. I studied this just 2 days ago:

Studies on sleep deprivation are actually beginning to show that people do not require as much sleep as traditionally taught. While sleep deficits effect first auditory acuity, and can even cause people to go into what are called microsleeps, researchers are finding that when people are being deprived of sleep they actually sleep more efficiently (spending more time in stages 3 and 4 of sleep) The problem is that people do not train themselves properly to shortened sleep periods, thus stuggle to adapt when they cannot receive the customary eight hours. Ideally, with adequate control and preperation, people can sleep for 4 hours a night and be fully cognatively functional.

(DaVinci purportedly survived on 15min cat naps taken every four hours his entire adult life, and he was certainly on his toes)

Just thought you'de find that interesting

See Pinel's chapter on Sleep in his text "Biopsychology" for more. (Pinel, 2009)

Adieu

More discussions about deprivation
References in classic literature ?
Daniel Quilp pulled his hat over his brows, climbed on to the desk (which had a flat top) and stretching his short length upon it went to sleep with ease of an old pactitioner; intending, no doubt, to compensate himself for the deprivation of last night's rest, by a long and sound nap.
His long-continued tortures and deprivations destroyed him at last, on the third of January.
Prior Information Notice: Deprivation of liberty safeguards assessments.
Raz's work focuses heavily on the study of sensory deprivation and its emergence as a viable field of research in the 1950s.
With the Welsh Government pledging to raise ambition and attainment in schools through the allocation of the pupil deprivation grant and scrutiny from Estyn intensifying, the National Pupil Deprivation Grant Conference comes at a critical time to bring you transferable lessons from best practice organisations on demonstrating impact and engaging students through utilising the grant effectively.
This correlation between socioeconomic deprivation and terrorism is strongly rejected by a second group of analysts.
Summary: More than half of families in Tripoli suffer from deprivation, with the figure rising to more than four in five families in the notoriously restive Bab al-Tabbaneh neighborhood, according to a newly released study by a U.
The genetic variant also appears to provide greater resistance to the effects of sleep deprivation.
What I wanted to investigate was whether there might be differences in the consequences of sleep deprivation depending on the severity of such deprivations," says Meldrum, co-author of the study.
He said: "Regions with high levels of deprivation and need are facing massive reductions, whilst regions with significantly lower levels of deprivation and need are facing much small reductions.
I've been interested in sleep deprivation for 40 years, since a week when I didn't sleep for six days," Nancy Sutter Axford e-mailed.
12 ( ANI ): Researchers have showed that stress in pancreatic cells due to sleep deprivation could contribute to the loss or dysfunction of these cells important to maintaining proper blood sugar levels, and that these functions may be exacerbated by normal aging.