depressive episode


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depressive episode

1. a manifestation of a major mood disorder involving an enduring period of some or all of the following signs: significant sadness, tearfulness, decreased appetite, weight loss, sleep and energy disturbance, psychomotor agitation or retardation, feelings of worthlessness, guilt, helplessness, hopelessness, decreased concentration, thoughts of death, and suicidal ideation.
See also: major depression, bipolar disorder, affective disorders. Compare: manic episode.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when specified criteria are met.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, aggressiveness in the context of a major depressive episode (MDE) may be an indicator of increased risk for suicidal behavior, according to her post-hoc analysis of the Bipolar Disorders: Improving Diagnosis, Guidance and Education study
This study was designed to study pattern of cognitive impairment after TIVA and GA for ECT in patient with severe depressive episode.
19) In the multicenter study from France (EPIDEP), 250 patients diagnosed with major depressive episode were reevaluated for "soft" bipolar disorders.
Many studies compared the ATFs differences between individuals with unipolar depression and individuals duringthe onset period of a depressive episode of BD in recent years.
are smoking, drinking and experimenting with drugs less, but still face high rates of depressive episodes, according to a new national survey of mental health.
Whilst their use reduces the severity of depressive episodes and can promote remission of depressive episodes, treatment failure is high with as many as 50% failing to respond to first-line therapies.
Moderate depressive episode was the most frequent diagnosis [35 (48.
Type of Professional Seen Among Adults Aged 18 or Older With a Major Depressive Episode Who Received Treatment in the Past Year: 2012" (SAMHSA Fig.
An untreated depressive episode typically lasts about 6 months or longer.
For example, hypothyroidism can mimic many features of depression and is sometimes treated incorrectly as a depressive episode when, in fact, it represents a deficiency of thyroid hormone.
The findings of the multicenter, NIH-funded study, to appear in the November issue of JAMA-Archives of General Psychiatry, show that nearly all (96 percent) of the 196 teenagers in the research group either improved or fully recovered after an initial depressive episode, but that 47 percent of them had one or more subsequent depressive episodes in an average of two years.
The Phase 2 trial, which involved 150 patients experiencing a major depressive episode, found no benefit for patients treated with the experimental drug, a corticotropin releasing factor (CRF1) receptor antagonist called GSK561679.