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deploy

(di-ploy′) [Fr. deployer, to scatter]
1. To prepare personnel or resources for anticipated use, e.g. in a mass casualty or a field of battle.
2. To put into therapeutic use.
3. To insert (e.g., prostheses, stents).
deployment (mĕnt)
References in periodicals archive ?
All these previous approaches to Army force design shared one commonality: they were all division-based solutions to the problem of enhancing strategic deployability while retaining acceptable levels of lethality, survivability, and sustainability.
Deployability also brings certain reliability issues, he said.
Advocate for funding in this area based on the principle that money spent on training and equipment for their ground forces will have a greater and more immediate impact on deployability than money spent on expensive new fighters or ships.
In SDDC's Transportation Engineering Agency, we are helping ensure the deployability of tomorrow's forces and are contributing to the readiness of our nation through our Highways, Ports and Railways for National Defense programs.
Pacific Fleet ADM Gary Roughead recently visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), and spoke to the crew about the Navy's deployability and employability policies during an all hands call aboard the aircraft carrier.
The M777 has the deployability advantages of a lightweight system like the M119, but the firepower of a 155mm weapon like the larger M198.
The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command Transportation Engineering Agency (TEA) has revised three reference documents on deployability based on recent deployments and exercises.
Yet, when one considers the scope and breadth of security obligations, deployments, and ongoing missions presently assigned to American military forces and when we add up the burden this imposes on the American soldier and taxpayer alike it is clear that the goal of increasing allied defense spending to ensure greater alliance interoperability, deployability and combat effectiveness, confers a major, lasting and very strategic benefit on the security interests of the United States.
The DCI, launched in April 1999 after deficiencies were perceived in the Alliance's capabilities during Operation Allied Force, intends to increase NATO's military capabilities and interoperability through improvements in the deployability and mobility of forces, their sustainability, survivability, capability for effective engagement, and the effectiveness of their command and control.
Those characteristics are responsiveness, deployability, agility, versatility, lethality, survivability, and sustainability.
Multiple deployability in CH-46,47,53 series helos and CV-22 aircraft
The mission of TEA is to improve the global deployability and sustainment of U.