deplete

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deplete

[də·plēt′]
Etymology: L, deplere, to empty
to empty or unload or to cause depletion.

deplete

(dē-plēt′) [L. depletus, emptied]
To empty; to produce depletion.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this line of reasoning, the proceeds of the sale of depletable commodities should be devoted to capital investment, which includes additions to physical as well as human capital (education and health expenditures).
a turnkey contract), the intangible drilling costs under the contract must be allocated between depletable and depreciable classes of costs for purposes of calculating depletion and depreciation at the partner level.
He further added that the oil is a depletable product.
increases for the partner's distributive share of the partnership's excess of depletion deductions over the basis of the depletable property, (17)
Those extra depletable carbon pools have sponsored a huge understanding of where we are and how we got here: the Copernican revolution, Newton's laws, Darwin's and Einstein's insights, plate tectonics, the Hubble telescope.
The impact is determined by the amount of depletable raw materials and nonrenewable resources a company consumes to make its products and the quantity of waste and emissions that are generated in the process (www.
Such depletable fuels are also prone to rapid price escalations as well as significant price volatility, and exposed to sudden fluctuations in currency rates.
Since MLPs often own depreciable operational assets and depletable natural resources, the depreciation and depletion can be used by the unitholder as a tax shield.
He then placed depletable resources in a special category: "Resources that are being depleted obviously cannot be replaced and are therefore land, not capital goods.
Providing exclusive rights to land and other tangible resources limits the overuse of inherently depletable resources.
And resources like oil (and even fish stocks) are depletable (OECD, 2004a).
Part IV projects the international dimension; a world of nation states facing diminished depletable natural resources, climate change, and biodiversity loss.