depersonalization disorder


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depersonalization

 [de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun]
alteration in the perception of the self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is lost, manifested in a sense of unreality or self-estrangement, in changes of body image, or in a feeling that one does not control one's own actions and speech; seen in disorders such as depersonalization disorder (see also dissociative disorders), depression, hypochondriasis, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia, and schizotypal personality disorder. Some authorities do not draw a distinction between this concept and derealization, and use the term depersonalization to include both.
depersonalization disorder a dissociative disorder in which there are feelings of unreality and strangeness in one's perception of self or of one's body image. Individuals with this disorder may feel as though they are in a dream or are not totally in control of their actions. Episodes of depersonalization are usually accompanied by dizziness, anxiety, fears of going insane, and derealization.

Depersonalization as an isolated event occurs in many people without significantly affecting their functioning; it is considered a disorder only when it impairs the patient's daily activities, when it is not associated with some other mental disorder, and when the patient's perception of reality remains intact.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion dis·or·der

1. a disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent experiences of detachment from one's mental processes or body, as if one is an automaton, an outside observer, or in a dream; reality testing remains intact and there is clinically significant distress impairment.
2. a DSM diagnosis is established when the specified criteria are met.

depersonalization disorder

n.
A psychiatric disorder in which the normal sense of personal identity and reality is lost.

depersonalization disorder

an emotional disturbance characterized by depersonalization feelings in which a dreamlike atmosphere pervades the consciousness. The body may not feel like one's own, and dramatic and important events may be watched with equanimity. The reaction is commonly seen in various forms of schizophrenia and in severe depression.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion dis·or·der

(dē-pĕrsŏn-ăl-ī-zāshŭn dis-ōrdĕr)
Disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent experiences of detachment from one's mental processes or body, as if one is an automaton, an outside observer, or in a dream.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since both disorders are exacerbated by caffeine administration, Stein and Uhde (21) hypothesized that depersonalization disorder might share a common pathophysiology with panic disorder.
Feeling unreal: 30 cases of DSM-III-R depersonalization disorder.
A study of 117 patients with depersonalization disorder also showed that stress, negative affects, threatening social interaction, alcohol and drugs, and sleep deprivation were the most common exacerbating factors and that patients were most likely to be helped by relaxation, intense emotional or physical stimulation, positive social interaction, or task-focusing activities, said Dr.