depersonalization

(redirected from depersonalisation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to depersonalisation: depersonalisation disorder, Derealisation

depersonalization

 [de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun]
alteration in the perception of the self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is lost, manifested in a sense of unreality or self-estrangement, in changes of body image, or in a feeling that one does not control one's own actions and speech; seen in disorders such as depersonalization disorder (see also dissociative disorders), depression, hypochondriasis, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia, and schizotypal personality disorder. Some authorities do not draw a distinction between this concept and derealization, and use the term depersonalization to include both.
depersonalization disorder a dissociative disorder in which there are feelings of unreality and strangeness in one's perception of self or of one's body image. Individuals with this disorder may feel as though they are in a dream or are not totally in control of their actions. Episodes of depersonalization are usually accompanied by dizziness, anxiety, fears of going insane, and derealization.

Depersonalization as an isolated event occurs in many people without significantly affecting their functioning; it is considered a disorder only when it impairs the patient's daily activities, when it is not associated with some other mental disorder, and when the patient's perception of reality remains intact.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
A state in which one loses the feeling of one's own identity in relation to others in one's family or peer group, or loses the feeling of one's own reality.

depersonalization

/de·per·son·al·iza·tion/ (de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun) alteration in the perception of self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is temporarily lost or changed; it may be a manifestation of a neurosis or another mental disorder or can occur in mild form in normal persons.

depersonalization

[dēpur′sənəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + persona, mask
a feeling of strangeness or unreality concerning oneself or the environment, often resulting from anxiety, stress, or fatigue. Also called self- alienation. See also alienation, depersonalization disorder.

depersonalization

Psychiatry A sense of unreality or strangeness vis-á-vis the environment and/or self; a personality disorder in which the Pt thinks that either he or those in his environment have been changed into other people or life-forms; depersonalization classically occurs in schizophrenia, but may also occur in hysteria, depression, drug-induced states, temporal lobe epilepsy, and fatigue. See Derealization, Neurosis. Cf Dehumanization.
Depersonalization disorder–
A  Persistent or recurrent sensation of detachment from one's own body, as if in a dream
B  During the depersonalization experience, the subject's reality testing remains intact
C  The depersonalization results in significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, other function
D  The experience does not occur exclusively during the course of another mental disorder
DSM-IV™, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC, 1994  

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
A state in which someone loses the feeling of his own identity in relation to others in his family or peer group, or loses the feeling of his own reality.
Synonym(s): depersonalisation.

depersonalization

Loss of the sense of one's own reality. A dream-like feeling of being detached from one's own body or a feeling that one's body is unreal or strange. This may be a normal phenomenon.

Depersonalization

A dissociative symptom in which the patient feels that his or her body is unreal, is changing, or is dissolving.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regression analysis with Emotional Intelligence as an Independent Variable and Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment, Depersonalisation and Overall Job Burnout as dependent variables demonstrated that all four equations (Equation 2a, 2b, 2c and 2d respectively) were significant at .
This removal of identity was achieved through depersonalisation and disassociation.
Respondents' MBIE subscale scores (Maslach, 1996) MBIE subscale Level score ranges Low Medium High Emotional exhaustion 0 to 16 17 to 26 27 or over Depersonalisation 0 to 8 9 to 13 14 or over Personal accomplishment 37 or over 31 to 36 0 to 30 MBIE subscale Respondents' mean score Emotional exhaustion 17.
H5: Mentoring significantly moderates the relationship between Depersonalisation and Job Satisfaction
This sense of growth is consistent with a realisation that sex with a black man who also suffers racial depersonalisation does not constitute a useful black female "ontological resistance" (Fanon 1967: 110), and is also indicative of her admission of complicity in the gendered discourse that she seems to be using to negotiate colonial alienation when she sleeps with Hendrikse.
In a later essay on Breytenbach's prison autobiography Jacobs identified two aspects of the effect of imprisonment, namely the disintegration of the self, which often occurs as a consequence of the dread / debility / dependency or DDD syndrome (see West 1985: 69-80), and the splitting of the self during depersonalisation (Jacobs 1986:104).
Applying validated criteria of emotional exhaustion (above 26) and depersonalisation (above 9), the prevalence of burnout in Hong Kong respondents was 65.
Dr Paul O'Connell said depersonalisation is under-recognised and is only lately the subject of research.
The drug should never be abruptly withdrawn as this can lead to anxiety, irritability, depersonalisation, hallucinations and various serious nervous system symptoms.
It has avoided the pitfalls of societies which have experienced rapid and far reaching change--especially depersonalisation and standardisation.
In addition, the Maslach Burnout Inventory which was used to measure dimensions of teachers' burnout consisted of three subscales: emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment and depersonalisation.
Bureaucracies can represent an extreme of depersonalisation, because the roles of officials are circumscribed by written definitions of their authority, and there is a set of rules and procedures to cater for every contingency.