dependent variable


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variable

 [var´e-ah-b'l]
something that changes; an attribute or property of a person, event, or object that is known to vary in a given study.
dependent variable in a mathematical equation or relationship between two or more variables, a variable whose value depends on those of others; it represents a response, behavior, or outcome that the researcher wishes to predict or explain.
extraneous variable a factor that is not itself under study but affects the measurement of the study variables or the examination of their relationships.
independent variable in a mathematical equation or relationship between two or more variables, any variable whose value determines that of others; it represents the treatment or experimental variable that is manipulated by the researcher to create an effect on the dependent variable.

de·pen·dent var·i·a·ble

in experiments, a variable that is influenced by or dependent on changes in the independent variable; for example, the amount of a written passage retained (dependent variable) as a function of the different numbers of minutes (independent variable) allowed to study the passage.

dependent variable

(in research) a factor that is measured to learn the effect of one or more independent variables. For example, in a study of the effect of preoperative nursing intervention on postoperative vomiting, vomiting is the dependent variable measured to determine the effect of the nursing intervention. Compare independent variable.

dependent variable

An objective finding measured in an experiment that is expected to change as a result of an experimental manipulation of the independent variable(s).

dependent variable

Epidemiology An outcome variable/variables that reflects other, independent, variables in the relationship being studied. See Variable.

variable

1. any type of measurement, quantitative or qualitative, of which a series of individual observations is made so that it has, as a principal characteristic, the potential for variability.
2. has the quality of variability.

variable agent
an agent in the cause of a disease which is capable of variation in intensity, e.g. weather, as contrasted to one that is not variable, e.g. Salmonella dublin.
concomitant v's
in experimental design these refer to factors that affect the dependent variable, but are not themselves influenced by the treatment (e.g. age of animal). The effect of concomitant variables can be removed by suitable experimental design or by including them in the model.
continuous variable
one in which all values within a given range are possible, e.g. birth weights of calves.
variable costs
costs which vary with the dimensions of the activity. Includes seed, fertilizer, teat dip, worm drench. Called also direct costs. See also fixed costs.
dependent variable
1. in statistics the variable predicted by a regression equation.
2. a variable which depends on other variables for its value.
discontinuous variable
see discrete variable (below).
discrete variable
one in which the possible values are not on a continuous scale, e.g. the number of sheep in a flock.
endogenous variable
dependent variable.
exogenous variable
independent or predetermined variable.
independent variable
one not dependent on other variables but capable of affecting dependent variables, thus an input variable.
spatial variable
a measurement relating to area or location.
temporal variable
one relating to chronological time.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that it is chiefly concerned with variables, that most of these are dependent variables, and that they must therefore be regarded as functions.
Measurement of the dependent variable during a baseline should occur until the observed pattern of responding is sufficiently consistent to allow prediction of future responding.
The interpretive framework for comparison of the dummy coefficients now represents the net effect of being in the category associated with the dummy variable as compared to the overall mean or grand mean of the dependent variable, Y = [b.
Unless otherwise noted in any table, the absence of data related to the coefficient on the missing data variable means no significant differences (in the dependent variable score) were observed between cases with missing data versus the omitted variable during multiple regression runs or in the computation of final effect estimates.
Regressions are estimated using OLS and include a constant and one lag of the dependent variable.
In all three MANOVA's, the independent variable was two levels of game outcome (win/loss), and the multivariate dependent variables were cognitive state anxiety, somatic state anxiety, and self-confidence as measured by the ARS-2.
Censoring might not be apparent until after data are collected and an examination of the distribution of the dependent variable suggests an upper or lower value at which observations are clustered.
Regression between the independent variables (quality of service) and the dependent variable (purchase intention) shows that there is significant positive correlation between these two variables.
Moreover, in time series or panel regressions, GRP growth coincident with unchanged oil sector output would increase the dependent variable while reducing the resource measure producing a negative [alpha], which would be a misleading outcome.
In the interest of brevity, we focus our discussion on the robustness of our main dependent variables, academic publications and citations to academic publications.
The second way a lagged dependent variable "can suppress the explanatory power of other independent variables" (Achen 2001, 1) is that the lagged variable controls for the factors that made the dependent variable what it was in period t-1--the same factors that are impacting it in period t.
In addition to testing for Granger causality from individual indexes to the dependent variable, the analysis tested the joint lagged values of variables at stages of processing before and after the dependent variable for Granger causality.