deoxyhemoglobin

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Related to deoxyhaemoglobin: Deoxyhemoglobin

deoxyhemoglobin

 [de-ok″sĭ-he´mo-glo″bin]
hemoglobin not combined with oxygen, formed when oxyhemoglobin releases its oxygen to the tissues.

deoxyhemoglobin

/de·oxy·he·mo·glo·bin/ (-he″mo-glo´bin) hemoglobin not combined with oxygen, formed when oxyhemoglobin releases its oxygen to the tissues.

de·ox·y·he·mo·glob·in

(dē-oks'ē-hē'mŏ-glō-bin)
The reduced form of hemoglobin, resulting when oxyhemoglobin loses its oxygen.
Synonym(s): deoxyhaemoglobin.
[de- + oxy- + hemoglobin]

deoxyhemoglobin

hemoglobin not combined with oxygen, formed when oxyhemoglobin releases its oxygen to the tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal arises from the higher ratio of oxy- to deoxyhaemoglobin that accompanies neuronal activation.
A novel allosteric mechanism in haemoglobin structure of bovine deoxyhaemoglobin, absence of specific chloride-binding sites and origin of the chloride-linked Bohr effect in bovine and human haemoglobin.
13,14) Central to retinal oximetry is the differing spectral properties of oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin (see Figure 4).
For the purpose of retinal oximetry, this requires the measurement of light absorption at a minimum of two wavelengths to determine the relative concentrations of oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin, and, therefore, enabling the oxygen saturation of a blood vessel to be determined.
Oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin absorb light in the 650 - 1 000 nm wavelength range, and attenuate measurements of light transmitted through tissue.
A localised increase in metabolic demand in a cortical region results in an increase in oxyhaemoglobin and a decrease in deoxyhaemoglobin which can be measured by detectors placed on the scalp, as shown in Fig.
Oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin absorb infrared light at different and well separated wavelengths.
In the case of KS, near-infrared wavelengths (700-1000nm) are utilised because the absorptions of oxy- and/or deoxyhaemoglobin are relatively high compared to water and lipids at those wavelengths.
After occluding the circulation with a rubber band, the two absorption bands of oxyhaemoglobin disappeared and the band of deoxyhaemoglobin appeared.
This is because the standard pulse oximeter cannot differentiate between methaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin based on their absorption spectrum, whereas ABG [O.
The presence of deoxyhaemoglobin in the tissue being imaged therefore perturbs the magnetic field, resulting in a signal loss as measured by T2*-weighted MR imaging.