deontology


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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
84 Univariate Tests of Significance Variable F Significance Group Deontology 26.
That disciplines such as natural philosophy and astrology were considered to be associated with medicine at the University of Coimbra is suggested by the mention of this idea in the works on medical deontology of two physicians who had studied there, Jeronimo de Miranda and Henrique Jorge Henriques.
Summary Statement 2: An analysis of the dominant ethical philosophy in a society, deontology versus teleology, will aid in the development of a more effective code of ethics.
Also odd is Hurd's argument that deontology does not mandate a duty not to be negligent.
Deontology and teleology are often considered as two radically opposed approaches to judge ethical behavior (Ferrell and Gresham 1985).
A moral philosophy informed by qualified deontology prioritizes deontological interests, but does not guarantee them absolutely:
The seminar will last till tomorrow (Wednesday), where Minister Daouk is scheduled to chair the third work session on media ethics and deontology.
Robert Shaver's discussion of deontology and agent-relative reasons through Ross and Carritt, Philip Stratton-Lake's argument against derivative prima facie duties on the basis of Ross, and Olson and Timmons' discussion of metaethical non-naturalism through Ewing belong to this category.
emotions," (26) deontology is also subject to the biases and
It also covers the major normative theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, divine command theory, natural law, cultural relativism, and rights-based theories.
Mingers and Walsham (2010) review philosophical underpinnings of ethics highlighting the challenges of consequentialism (judging behavior based on its consequences), deontology (considering the character of actions inherently without consideration of consequences), and virtue ethics, the concept of striving for a full and complete life and, thus, evaluating behaviors with consideration of their context.
This decision and others like it give us grounds for thinking that Wright J's exclusive focus on deontology is unsatisfactory.