deontology

(redirected from deontologists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to deontologists: consequentialists

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Not only do they present people as multidimensional, rather than solely as egoists, or utilitarians, or deontologists, thus making literature more realistic, but they also explore how characters change as the stories unfold.
Even deontologists and virtue ethicists accept that it is not feasible to spend unlimited resources to combat such social ills, but it rankles to hear such ills described with the affirmative valence of efficiency or optimality--which is of course part of the point.
Deontologist are concerned with motive, not outcome, and judge an action according to whether or not it is the right thing to do.
But deontologists can insist that our best deontological theory gives persons permissions to do what is consequentially sub-optimal.
If so, judges should adopt for instrumental reasons the conception of rights on which they enjoy the kind of priority accorded to them by deontologists.
readings tend to be deontologists, not consequentialists.
says deontologists commonly portray duty as obligatory and virtue as optional; meanwhile, some virtue ethicists eschew language of duty altogether.
significant what for deontologists is morally irrelevant--namely, the
If soft model HR management genuinely promotes greater human development for all employees, it would pass muster in terms of the deontologists.
Fritzsche and Becker 1983, 1984, which classify managers as deontologists or rule-utilitarians), based on responses to dilemmas presented in vignettes.
Probably most deontologists share the intuition that the duty not to punish the innocent is typically stronger than the duty to uphold the systemic values.
Kant is the most famous of modern deontologists, Alan Donagan a contemporary and helpful example, since he examines cases of political necessity from within the perspective of just such a morality.