deontology

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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Sunstein and Vermeule include an appeal to deontologists in their
Should the acts of intercourse and the effects of those acts be at the center of ethical discussion, as they were for the deontologists and the proportionalists?
The deontologist keeps his hands clean; the consequentialist gets his hands dirty.
Finally, while deontologists and utilitarians alike think that all moral problems are, in principle, resolvable, for many philosophers, such as Lyotard (1989) and Hampshire (1987), morality is essentially conflictual.
significant what for deontologists is morally irrelevant--namely, the
This remains true whatever theory of right and wrong one may hold, whether one is a moral absolutist or relativist, a deontologist or utilitarian, or a communitarian or a social constructionist.
The modern deontologist asserted that ethical conduct is conduct, which can be shown to conform to the dictates of rationally demonstrable moral principles.
Although Beauchamp is a professed "rule utilitarian" and Childress a professed "rule deontologist," this common metric of principles allows for ethical decisionmaking they can both agree to, despite the massive amount of information about their ethical inclinations represented by the phrases "rule utilitarian" and "rule deontologist.
In the absence of an alternative to empiricism's principle of verification, Hazlitt often postulates the existence of a faculty which might simultaneously satisfy the deontologist in him by carrying out the productive synthesis which makes moral reasoning and disinterested action possible, and the harassed epistemologist in him who still retains a concern that such creativity might never be lawful, that the mind cannot be trusted to give the rule to itself in terms of either its knowledge or its practical decisions.
These suggestions do not assume that the reader is a consequentialist, a deontologist, or a pragmatic mix.
Hence, I hope that it becomes clear that many different kinds of liberals--including deontologist as well as consequentialist liberals--should favour extensive free speech since the argument will rest on premises that all liberals share.
Unlike the deontologist, he denies that there are certain actions that one must do or not do apart from their expected good or bad results (see also 16-25 for Tully's defense of the distinction between the two ethics).