deontologism


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deontologism

[dē′ontol′əgiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, deon, obligation, logos, science
a doctrine of ethics that states that moral duty or obligation is binding even though a moral action may be different or result in painful consequences, also, that what makes acts right are nonconsequential characteristics such as fidelity, veracity, justice, and honesty. Compare natural law, utilitarianism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ross's oft-neglected theory, sometimes called multiple-rule deontologism.
Two major categories of moral theory that traditionally oppose each other are deontologism and consequentialism/utilitarianism.
Chapter 4 takes up the second motivation for internalism, deontologism.
They seek to argue for this version of liberalism without appealing either to ethical relativism or skepticism or to utilitarianism, deontologism, or contractarianism.
Its deontologism is not a secular ethics without God as we have in Immanuel Kant's Ethics.
John Hare's "Augustine, Kant, and the Moral Gap" looks at the relationship between Divine Command and natural human capacities, an Augustinian theme treated within the "stoic maxim" of Kant's deontologism.
It could be argued that, in fact, his study prejudices the case for deontologism, for it is deontologism rather than consequentialism which holds that ethical language can stand as so many logical formalisms, dismissing desires and external goods as irrelevancies to ethics.
Such a focus, eluding deontologism and over-universality, nonetheless will recognize not only a causal but a principled and content-laden contribution of natural law to ethics, in the form of that hierarchy of ends which provides the compass for practical life.